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  #11  
Old 28th August 2014, 05:01 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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I would argue this way:

Genocide is essentially a type of murder. God cannot commit murder because He is Just and Merciful by His very nature. But also, we know that God is the author of all life. So our lives are His; he can choose to end someone's life at any time, without it being murder.

For example, the Virgin Mary was not subject to death from disease or accident or old age, because she was not in fallen state. She died because it was God's will, and her will to follow her Son in death to Heaven. God did not commit murder by deciding that His Son would die for us, nor by deciding that Mary would imitate Christ even in death. It fulfills the purpose of God.

For the guilty, the death penalty is moral as a punishment for grave crimes.

Also, all fallen sinners die, sooner or later, because they are in the fallen state.

So God did not sin by deciding that certain tribes in the Promised Land would be put to death for their sins and for God's purpose.

In Scripture, I notice that, at a certain point in time, God tells the Israelites to pass through the land of one of the tribes (later to be put to death). And He tells them not to stray from their path, not to kill or harm anyone, and to pay for anything they take, such as water. He explains that these tribes have not yet filled up the crimes that will later be the cause of God's judgment to order them put to death by the Israelites.

As for the innocent among those tribes, God has the authority to decide when each person dies, even Jesus and Mary (two most innocent persons).

I should also point out that the Israelites did not in fact kill all member of those tribes. Some converted to Judaism and were spared. Others took roles as servants and were spared.
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  #12  
Old 28th August 2014, 06:32 PM
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Thank you Ron, good points.

God is the author of life and since we are all in a fallen state, we are subject to corruption and death, this can explain why miscarriages some time happen.

Also, on a personal thought, God had to be harsher in the OT because people from that time were polytheist (believing in many gods), so He had to be known as the only God, and little by little, prepare the world for the coming of the Messiah, Jesus Christ. Furthermore, people from the OT carried original sin, since the Sacrament of Baptism was not established yet, so, different ways had to be imposed on primitive people by God. Still, this world is not our final destination, God desires that our final destination is Heaven. God's ways are always good (even if we, limited creatures, don't understand them), so His ways are in order to send most people as possible to Heaven. Therefore, since God is Just and Merciful, the children who were killed by God's order are thankful and joyful to be in a final destination such as Heaven instead of suffering in Hell.
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  #13  
Old 28th August 2014, 09:11 PM
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“Those who are scandalized and rebel against what happens to them”: “Everything comes from love, all is ordained for the salvation of man, God does nothing without this goal in mind.” - St. Catherine of Sienna.
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  #14  
Old 28th August 2014, 09:33 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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That's a good point about the necessity for God to be somewhat harsher in OT times. The Judea-Christian ethic was not established in society yet. The Israelites lived in a world heavily influenced by sinful pagan religions. The OT had the death penalty for many offenses, so as to establish justice in a thoroughly unjust world. Without that harshness, the chosen people might not have succeeded (as they did) in preparing the way for the Messiah.

Once Christ arrived, the death penalty was much less necessary. Christianity spread quickly to many nations. Even today, secular society -- while rejecting the Church to a great extent -- is still influenced by the Judeo-Christian ethic.
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