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  #11  
Old 26th November 2012, 02:31 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Is it right to believe that a person may be repentant from actual mortal sin by way of a perfect Act of Contrition at the hour of death if the sacrament of Reconciliation is not possible? I think that I read this some time ago here on catholicplanet, perhaps posted by you.

At any time, a person who is in a state of actual mortal sin can return to the state of grace immediately by a sincere Act of Contrition out of love for God and neighbor. This type of contrition is called "perfect" not because the person must say it perfectly, but because they motivation -- love of God -- is the most perfect motivation for contrition. A person who returns to the state of grace in this way must still go to Confession, if he or she is able.

Contrition motivated by an ordered love of self, such as wanting to avoid Hell, wanting to be a better person, is imperfect contrition and requires Confession in order to return to the state of grace.
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  #12  
Old 26th November 2012, 04:33 PM
Shane Shane is offline
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I think it's one of the greatest heresies of our times that many people today (many Catholics) seem indifferent or complacent about their own salvation, that there is the attitude that everybody is going to Heaven, and that there is no purgatory and so on. The new age movement has contributed to this also to a great extent. For example, many of these so-called 'angel groups' apart from the fact that God is hardly ever mentioned, put forward a simplistic and overly positive view of an afterlife where all are saved and happy without exception. I have seen this attitude with psychic mediums over the years as well, people having been told that their loved ones are 'okay', 'very happy' 'watching over them' etc. without telling them specifically where they are. Not one of these have I ever seen to mention purgatory or hell; these are treated as if they don't exist. So as Catholics we have a lot to do in putting forward a proper and sound theology of salvation to many.
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  #13  
Old 26th November 2012, 04:42 PM
Joey Joey is offline
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Oh so true Shane. My childhood friend of 56 years once ceased speaking to me over this issue . Thankfully we have mended fences, but she agrees to disagree with me concerning Purgatory.
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  #14  
Old 27th November 2012, 01:40 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Salvation in Christ Is Offered to All

10. The universality of salvation means that it is granted not only to those who explicitly believe in Christ and have entered the Church. Since salvation is offered to all, it must be made concretely available to all. But it is clear that today, as in the past, many people do not have an opportunity to come to know or accept the gospel revelation or to enter the Church. The social and cultural conditions in which they live do not permit this, and frequently they have been brought up in other religious traditions. For such people salvation in Christ is accessible by virtue of a grace which, while having a mysterious relationship to the Church, does not make them formally part of the Church but enlightens them in a way which is accommodated to their spiritual and material situation. This grace comes from Christ; it is the result of his Sacrifice and is communicated by the Holy Spirit. It enables each person to attain salvation through his or her free cooperation.

For this reason the Council, after affirming the centrality of the Paschal Mystery, went on to declare that "this applies not only to Christians but to all people of good will in whose hearts grace is secretly at work. Since Christ died for everyone, and since the ultimate calling of each of us comes from God and is therefore a universal one, we are obliged to hold that the Holy Spirit offers everyone the possibility of sharing in this Paschal Mystery in a manner known to God."

Pope John Paul II, Redemptoris Missio
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  #15  
Old 10th December 2012, 01:40 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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How many souls will be sent to Hell: none, few, many?
What percentage of souls will be saved?

Some very liberal authors say that Hell might be empty. But this assertion is abject heresy. Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture clearly teach the divinely-revealed truth that Hell is not empty. Christ was very clear that some souls go to Hell.

Fr. Barron, a very liberal theologian, says that very few souls go to Hell, because, he says, the only way to Hell is to have the love of God and neighbor completely extinguished. He thinks that even persons who sin a great deal have some small amount of love of God or neighbor. But this position is incompatible with Catholic dogma.

The Magisterium teaches that all who die unrepentant from one or more actual mortal sins will be sent to Hell by God. An actual mortal sin causes the loss of the state of grace, so that the person no longer has supernatural love of God and neighbor.

So the situation is not as Fr. Barron and other liberal authors say. It is not possible to sin gravely, by actual mortal sin, and still have some degree of the theological virtue of love.

In addition, there are many Saints who taught that Hell contains many souls.

At Fatima, Mary said: "Pray, pray much and make sacrifices for sinners; many souls go to hell because they have no one to pray and make sacrifices for them."

At Medjugorje, Mary said: "The majority of people go to Purgatory. Many go to hell. A small number go directly to Heaven." (January 10, 1983)

Pope Pius XI taught: "Yet her [the Church's] maternal heart cannot but be moved by the countless evils with which so many thousands would be afflicted during storms of this kind, and above all by the consequent enormous injury to spiritual life which would work eternal ruin to so many souls redeemed by the Blood of Jesus Christ." (encyclical)
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  #16  
Old 18th December 2012, 05:31 AM
Pontifex Pontifex is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Salvation in Christ Is Offered to All

10. The universality of salvation means that it is granted not only to those who explicitly believe in Christ and have entered the Church. Since salvation is offered to all, it must be made concretely available to all. But it is clear that today, as in the past, many people do not have an opportunity to come to know or accept the gospel revelation or to enter the Church. The social and cultural conditions in which they live do not permit this, and frequently they have been brought up in other religious traditions. For such people salvation in Christ is accessible by virtue of a grace which, while having a mysterious relationship to the Church, does not make them formally part of the Church but enlightens them in a way which is accommodated to their spiritual and material situation. This grace comes from Christ; it is the result of his Sacrifice and is communicated by the Holy Spirit. It enables each person to attain salvation through his or her free cooperation.

For this reason the Council, after affirming the centrality of the Paschal Mystery, went on to declare that "this applies not only to Christians but to all people of good will in whose hearts grace is secretly at work. Since Christ died for everyone, and since the ultimate calling of each of us comes from God and is therefore a universal one, we are obliged to hold that the Holy Spirit offers everyone the possibility of sharing in this Paschal Mystery in a manner known to God."

Pope John Paul II, Redemptoris Missio

Ron,

One question I ask myself though is how do we reconcile the idea that we cannot be saved by acts alone, we need faith and works ?

[Hebrews]
{11:6} But without faith, it is impossible to please God. For whoever approaches God must believe that he exists, and that he rewards those who seek him.

Is implicit charity enough ?

The Gospel of St. Mathew would seem to suggest so:

{25:34} Then the King shall say to those who will be on his right: ‘Come, you blessed of my Father. Possess the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.
{25:35} For I was hungry, and you gave me to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave me to drink; I was a stranger, and you took me in;
{25:36} naked, and you covered me; sick, and you visited me; I was in prison, and you came to me.’

However, the Council of Trent says that a man cannot be justified before God by his works alone without the grace of God that comes through Jesus Christ.
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  #17  
Old 18th December 2012, 01:07 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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In order to be saved, a person must die in a state of grace. The state of grace includes the three theological virtues of love, faith, and hope. The gift of the state of grace is not earned by us, it is a free gift from God through Christ.

A baptism of desire is given to persons who cooperate with grace fully, in an act of love of God and neighbor. However, the person does not earn the state of grace by an act. Rather, the graces that the person is given, with their free cooperation, confers the baptism of desire. Similarly, for an adult baptism with water, the free consent and cooperation of the adult is necessary, but the justification of baptism is still a free gift. It is not earned by acts.

The baptism of desire can be an act of love of neighbor, in full cooperation with the gift of grace, which is implicitly love of God.

After baptism, we are required to do two types of works: fulfilling the positive precepts and refraining from violating the negative precepts. These are necessary for salvation to the extent that keeping the precepts prevents us from losing the state of grace by actual mortal sin.
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  #18  
Old 6th July 2013, 02:07 PM
Therese Therese is offline
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I have read this section, thank you. I have recently read some comments by Pope Francis ,quoted on your blog about salvation. This has given me much to learn from and think about. Therese
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  #19  
Old 27th August 2013, 04:12 PM
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James 2 gives a good explanation on salvation theology. He also mentions how Rahab, the harlot, was justified by her good works.

It's good to read the entire Chapter, but I'm posting the first and final verse:

{2:1} My brothers, within the glorious faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, do not choose to show favoritism toward persons.

{2:26} For just as the body without the spirit is dead, so also faith without works is dead.
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  #20  
Old 27th August 2013, 04:49 PM
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Persons who appear to be good exteriorly, but are prideful and disdaining others, are not justified.


Luke

{18:9} Now about certain persons who consider themselves to be just, while disdaining others, he told also this parable:
{18:10} “Two men ascended to the temple, in order to pray. One was a Pharisee, and the other was a tax collector.
{18:11} Standing, the Pharisee prayed within himself in this way: ‘O God, I give thanks to you that I am not like the rest of men: robbers, unjust, adulterers, even as this tax collector chooses to be.
{18:12} I fast twice between Sabbaths. I give tithes from all that I possess.’
{18:13} And the tax collector, standing at a distance, was not willing to even lift up his eyes to heaven. But he struck his chest, saying: ‘O God, be merciful to me, a sinner.’
{18:14} I say to you, this one descended to his house justified, but not the other. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled; and whoever humbles himself will be exalted.”
{18:15} And they were bringing little children to him, so that he might touch them. And when the disciples saw this, they rebuked them.
{18:16} But Jesus, calling them together, said: “Allow the children to come to me, and do not be an obstacle to them. For of such is the kingdom of God.
{18:17} Amen, I say to you, whoever will not accept the kingdom of God like a child, will not enter into it.”


In order to enter Heaven one need to be humble and meek like Christ, and follow the law, yes, but from the heart, not just to make a 'check/done' list of things.
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