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Old 30th January 2015, 02:28 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default Salvation for non-Catholic Christians

Every adult Protestant or Orthodox Christian has an objective grave moral obligation to convert to Catholicism. Protestantism is material heresy; every Protestant denomination teaches grave errors on faith and morals. All human persons are morally obligated to seek the truth on important matters of faith and morals. So to refuse to convert, once you have sufficient accurate knowledge of Catholicism, is an objective mortal sin.

But non-Catholic Christians can still be saved, without converting, if their refusal to convert is not an actual mortal sin. A sincerely mistaken conscience might reject membership in the Catholic Church without the full knowledge required for an actual mortal sin. If the Protestant or Orthodox Christian does not realize that he should convert, then it is not an actual mortal sin, and he or she can be saved without converting to Catholicism.

Of course, any Christian can lose their salvation by sins in other areas of life. A Protestant who is not guilty of actual mortal sin for refusing to convert might still be guilty of actual mortal sin for adultery or hatred or theft or murder.

It is also more difficult for a Protestant Christian to be saved than for an Orthodox or Catholic, since the latter have the Sacrament of Confession to forgive mortal sins, whereas the Protestants must repent with perfect contrition if they have sinned by actual mortal sin.
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Old 30th January 2015, 03:57 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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What are the valid Sacraments for non-Catholic Christians?

Christian Protestants: only Baptism?

Orthodox: Baptism and Confession?

any other?
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Old 30th January 2015, 06:16 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brother View Post
What are the valid Sacraments for non-Catholic Christians?

Christian Protestants: only Baptism?

Orthodox: Baptism and Confession?

any other?

Protestants: Baptism and Marriage
Orthodox: All seven Sacraments
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Old 30th January 2015, 10:01 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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Thanks Ron.

I thought Protestant marriages were not considered a Sacrament, only natural marriage.
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Old 31st January 2015, 12:21 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
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Thanks Ron.

I thought Protestant marriages were not considered a Sacrament, only natural marriage.

Pope Pius XI, Casti Connubii:
39. And since the valid matrimonial consent among the faithful was constituted by Christ as a sign of grace, the sacramental nature is so intimately bound up with Christian wedlock that there can be no true marriage between baptized persons "without it being by that very fact a sacrament."
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