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Old 1st May 2007, 08:45 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default TS 5: the Ordinary Magisterium

Infallible:

everything taught by Sacred Tradition
everything taught by Sacred Scripture
everything taught by Sacred Magisterium, in any of three ways:

1. papal infallibility
2. solemn definitions of Ecumenical Councils
3. the Universal Magisterium (also called the ordinary and universal Magisterium)

The Non-infallible Ordinary Magisterium

1. ordinary Papal teachings
2. ordinary teachings of Ecumenical Councils
3. any and all teachings of individual Bishops and of groups of local Bishops

The ordinary Magisterium (OM) is non-infallible, meaning that errors can occur, but never to such an extent as to lead the faithful away from the path of salvation.

The OM contains important, even essential teachings, for living the Catholic Faith according to the example of Christ. One cannot live the Catholic Faith based on infallible teachings alone.

Since these teachings are essential to salvation, and since these teachings cannot err in such a way as to lead the faithful away from salvation, the Church has the duty and the right to require the faithful to adhere to these teachings, even though they are not infallible. However, the kind and degree of assent required is different than for infallible teachings.

Infallible teachings require the full assent of faith (sacred assent). Non-infallible teachings require the general assent of will and intellect (ordinary assent). There can be no exception to the assent required to infallible teachings. However, non-infallible teachings can admit of some faithful dissent (in my view) based on higher teachings from Tradition, Scripture, Magisterium.
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Old 1st May 2007, 11:12 PM
Rob Rob is offline
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Ron,

Does the canonization of saints fall under the Ordinary Magisterium? Are there other roles that pertain to the OM other than teach from the sacred deposit of Faith?
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Old 2nd May 2007, 12:05 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Originally Posted by Rob View Post
Ron,

Does the canonization of saints fall under the Ordinary Magisterium? Are there other roles that pertain to the OM other than teach from the sacred deposit of Faith?

Some theologians believe that the canonization of Saints falls under papal infallibility; however, this is not the teaching of the Magisteium, but only an opinion of theologians.

In my opinion, canonization falls under the temporal authority of the Church, not the teaching authority, because it the judgment of temporal circumstances is essential to the decision as to who to canonize.

The OM is the ordinary teaching authority of the Church; that is its only role: teaching.


Ron
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Old 2nd May 2007, 02:20 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Some theologians believe that the canonization of Saints falls under papal infallibility; however, this is not the teaching of the Magisteium, but only an opinion of theologians.

In my opinion, canonization falls under the temporal authority of the Church, not the teaching authority, because it the judgment of temporal circumstances is essential to the decision as to who to canonize.

The OM is the ordinary teaching authority of the Church; that is its only role: teaching.


Ron

Hi Ron, so there are these two possibilities regarding the Canonization of saints, Papal infallibility and Temporal Authorization of the Church:

This is my understanding, opinion and speculation regarding the two positions, correct me if I’m wrong:

Since there is not a definite teaching of the Magisterium (as yet) regarding this position, it is still hard to come to a conclusion here on earth under what definition it would infallibility fall, maybe we’ll know for sure once in Heaven. However, we have the basic knowledge to come to a non-infallible conclusion.

Before a person is canonized saint, goes through a series of study and research by the Magisterium and also includes the participation of lay persons to probe that a person deserves the title (it requires a minimum of three big miracles to be declared saint), it takes many years for the declaration to take place and even centuries.

Now, the canonization can be:

A) Temporal Authority of the Church only:

Jesus Christ gave the authority to Peter to whatever he binds on earth, shall be bound in heaven. And whatever he releases on earth, shall be released in heaven {Matthew 16:19}; however, if a canonization doesn’t fall under Papal infallibility, then, this lives open to the possibility that there can be the rare case in which a person who has been declared saint by the Church, may have not deserved a straight Heaven by his/her own merits alone (perhaps deserved some degree Purgatory first). But since the Church has declared this person a saint, it would be like this person has gained a plenary indulgence (forgiveness of all his/her debts at the time of death) and therefore, a straight entrance to Heaven. Now, since God is all knowing, He is not limited by time, knows everything at once, past, present and future and knows who will be declared saint by the Church and who doesn’t, the person would have not have to wait until his/her particular canonization to take place in order to enter Heaven. And if this is the case, it could mean that not all his/her alleged miracles noted for his canonization, where not necessary through the merits of this person.

It can never and will never be the case that a person deserving hell, shall be canonized to be a saint by the Church because if this were the case, then, Jesus Christ and God the Father Who is all knowing of the past, present and future, would never have given this authority to Peter to begin with.

B) Papal infallibility:

This would mean that all the canonized saints by the Church deserved a straight Heaven by their own earthy merits alone.
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Old 2nd May 2007, 04:16 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Let me add some comments to what you have written.

Certainly, some persons who are not Saints can nevertheless go straight to Heaven.

My opinion is that some Saints may require a brief stay in Purgatory, because the Saints generally had some personal sin in their lives. God might require a Saint who could be very holy in a cloister, to go out into the world (because of the needs of sinners); and there that same Saint might not be able to maintain the same degree of sanctity. So, for the sake of God's will, some Saints might choose a path which gives them a lower degree of holiness and some time needed in Purgatory.

The temporal authority of the Church is fallible; it is not infallible and it is not non-infallible. So it is conceivable that the Pope and the Cardinals could err in declaring someone a venerable, blessed, or Saint. Even a venerable must have virtue practiced to an heroic degree. Ordinary holiness does not qualify someone for even the first step toward canonization. So a person who is mistakenly declared a Saint might have an ordinary degree of holiness, but might not be a true Saint.

The declaration by the Church that someone is a Saint certainly does not confer on that Saint a plenary indulgence; such a declaration does not make someone into a Saint, it merely judges from the evidence available that the person had the sanctity of a Saint. If the judgment is incorrect, the individual does not benefit by being brought directly to Heaven.

If canonizations fell under Papal infallibility, this does not necessarily mean that the individual went straight to Heaven; the least it would mean is that the person did have a high level of sanctity and that they did go to Heaven eventually. There is a range of theological opinions on what it would mean if canonizations where infallible.
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Old 2nd May 2007, 07:20 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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Thanks Ron for your clarification.
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Old 3rd May 2007, 06:28 PM
js1975 js1975 is offline
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I have never found a clear explanation of the communion of Saints. My understanding is that any soul in Heaven is part of the Communion of Saints, again considering time in Heaven, this means that any soul in Purgatory would also be considered in the Communion of Saints as well. If so, then you are only referring to Canonized Saints, not all souls in the Communion of Saints.

Is this correct?
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Old 10th May 2007, 07:43 AM
Justin Angel Justin Angel is offline
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Default Marian Papal Encyclicals

Ron, I believe papal Encyclicals like 'Supreme Apostolatus' of Leo Xlll and 'Caritate Christi' of Pius Xl,
in which Mary is given the title "Mediatrix of (all) Graces", fall under the Ordinary Magisterium. There are
even encyclicals which refer to Mary as "co-Redemptrix". Do these titles constitute official doctrinal teachings?
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Old 10th May 2007, 09:23 AM
Love The Fisherman
 
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Hi Ron,
It appears to me that it is the Non-infallible Ordinary Magisterium (The Local Bishop) that investigates and Rules in matters concerning Apparitions/Messages from Heaven. How can we then say that 'The Church' approves certain Apparition Sites? (like Akita). Also If the Non-infallible Ordinary Magisterium condemns certain 'Messages' Do I understand you correctly in saying that they cannot Err when doing so? I guess Im confused!
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Old 10th May 2007, 11:47 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by js1975 View Post
I have never found a clear explanation of the communion of Saints. My understanding is that any soul in Heaven is part of the Communion of Saints, again considering time in Heaven, this means that any soul in Purgatory would also be considered in the Communion of Saints as well. If so, then you are only referring to Canonized Saints, not all souls in the Communion of Saints.

Is this correct?

The communion of the saints does not refer only to Canonized Saints. All the faithful are saints, in Heaven, in Purgatory, and on earth. We are in one communion because it is the same Spirit who enlivens us, the Body of Christ, with Christ as our head. Through prayer, grace flows within the communion of the saints, so that any good deed or any prayer or any sacrifice benefits the whole Body. The faithful in Heaven especially have the task of praying for us on earth.
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