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Old 12th April 2010, 01:09 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default Catechism of Catholic Ethics, Chapter 2

The Eternal Moral Law

The moral law is not a set of written laws, although any requirement of the moral law can be written down. The moral law is not a set of decisions made by God about good and evil. The moral law is not a particular set of just laws, although all just laws are based on the moral law. The moral law is not the implementation of justice in particular cases. The moral law is justice itself. All that is contrary to the moral law is contrary to justice itself. All that is in agreement with the moral law is in agreement with justice itself. Although the whole moral law, in any and all of its requirements, can be understood by reason alone, and can be expressed in particular laws and implemented in particular cases, the moral law as a whole is greater than reason and greater than any set of written laws.
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Old 12th April 2010, 04:46 PM
Shane Shane is offline
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Can you say that as God is Justice itself, then God is the moral law?
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Old 12th April 2010, 05:25 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane View Post
Can you say that as God is Justice itself, then God is the moral law?

Yes, God is Justice. The eternal moral law is Justice. Therefore, God is the eternal moral law. Whoever violates the eternal moral law acts contrary to the very Nature of God.

Saint Thomas Aquinas: "So then no one can know the eternal law, as it is in itself, except the blessed who see God in His Essence."


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Old 14th April 2010, 06:04 PM
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The moral law is universal, applying to all persons, at all times, in all places, in all situations. There is no context in which the moral law changes, or in which the principles of morality are different, or in which nothing is immoral, or in which the moral law does not apply, or in which the moral law applies only in a limited way, or only to a limited extent. All the principles of the moral law are universal, applying to all persons, at all times, in all places, in all situations.
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Old 15th April 2010, 12:30 PM
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An unjust law is not a law.

Any human law, Church law, ruling, regulation, which is unjust, is not binding before the eyes of God.

An unjust law is a type of violence.

Should we disobey unjust laws? Our actions must always be just under the moral law. If disobeying an unjust law, such as excessive taxation, does more harm than good, you would obey the moral law by seeming to obey the unjust law (i.e. pay the excessive taxes).

But if an unjust law in effect commands us to sin, then we must not obey.
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Old 16th April 2010, 11:18 AM
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Since the moral law is a type of law -- it is actually the archetype of all law -- it must have the characteristics of law. According to St. Thomas, these are:

All just laws are
(1) reasonable,
(2) of proper authority,
(3) for the common good,
(4) promulgated,
(5) enforced.

The moral law is reasonable and understandable by reason, of proper authority, which is God, for the common good of humanity, promulgated by natural law and by Divine Revelation, enforced by God, who knows all sins and who punishes sin.
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