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Old 8th August 2010, 07:15 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default chapter 7: Culpability

Chapter 7
Degrees of Sin and of Culpability
The Catechism of Catholic Ethics

This chapter explains the different degrees of mortal sin, and of venial sin, and the various factors that make one sin objectively more or less serious. It also explains the factors that can lessen culpability. A sin can be objectively more or less serious. And given a particular degree of sinfulness to the act, objectively, the subjective culpability can vary. Two persons committing the same sin may have different degrees of culpability.

http://www.catechism.cc/ethics/index.htm
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Old 11th October 2010, 08:34 PM
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Culpability pertains to actual sin. The degree of culpability is the degree of guilt for actual sin. The degree of culpability differs from the degree of objective sin. An act that is objectively a mortal sin may have substantially reduced culpability, if the person did not know that the act was gravely immoral (but thought the act to be somewhat immoral), so that the culpability is reduced to that of an actual venial sin, not an actual mortal sin. In some cases, due to invincible ignorance, a person may have no culpability despite having freely chosen to do what is gravely immoral, if, with sincerity and without negligence in seeking moral truth, he did not realize that the act was at all sinful.

Culpability is guilt before God for knowingly chosen immoral acts (actual sins). If an act was not knowingly chosen, i.e. not freely chosen with knowledge that the act was immoral, then there is no culpability. All actual sins, and only actual sins, include culpability. A merely objective sin, no matter how gravely immoral, would have no culpability if the gravely immoral act was not knowingly chosen, i.e. not freely chosen in the knowledge that the act was immoral.
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Old 12th October 2010, 04:52 PM
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An example: A girl who commits the mortal sin of scandal by wearing immodest dressing, therefore causing fellow men to fall into her temptation and commit actual mortal sins and even be condemned to Hell forever.

The girl, however, wears this type of clothing because she has been instigated or prompted by her own parents since she was a child, she has been taught that it is fine to wear such clothes. She has also been influenced by secular society who regularly wears that type of clothing (short dresses, etc.), so she finds it permissible even though she finds in her heart that her type of clothing might be provocative for some men - but she ignores that some men could even be comdened to Hell forever because of that.

Ron, since there can not be invincible ignorance in this case, her objective mortal sin can be reduced to an actual venial sin?...

Last edited by Brother : 12th October 2010 at 04:54 PM.
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Old 12th October 2010, 06:28 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brother View Post
An example: A girl who commits the mortal sin of scandal by wearing immodest dressing, therefore causing fellow men to fall into her temptation and commit actual mortal sins and even be condemned to Hell forever.

The girl, however, wears this type of clothing because she has been instigated or prompted by her own parents since she was a child, she has been taught that it is fine to wear such clothes. She has also been influenced by secular society who regularly wears that type of clothing (short dresses, etc.), so she finds it permissible even though she finds in her heart that her type of clothing might be provocative for some men - but she ignores that some men could even be comdened to Hell forever because of that.

Ron, since there can not be invincible ignorance in this case, her objective mortal sin can be reduced to an actual venial sin?...

I don't agree that immodest clothing is an objective mortal sin. It is a matter of degree. Often immodest clothing will be only a venial sin. The immodest clothing does not cause an objective mortal sin committed by a man who sees her; it is only an influence, not a cause. Scandal is not always a mortal sin.

She might have invincible ignorance, if in her situation she is not able to perceive correct judgment on modesty, or she might have a substantial reduction in culpability due to substantial, but not full, ignorance on that same point.

Speaking in general, if an act is gravely immoral, a substantial reduction in knowledge of the immorality of the act, or in freedom of will in choosing the act, would reduce the objective mortal sin to an actual venial sin (or omit culpability entirely if there is no knowledge or no free choice).
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Old 12th October 2010, 07:15 PM
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Thanks Ron for the correction and clarification.
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