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Old 6th February 2010, 08:01 AM
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Sacredcello Sacredcello is offline
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Default Exodus 30

Hello Ron,

In the last several weeks I have been reading about the use of essential oils for the purpose of expelling disease. I have a question about the use of biblical oils and the following verses in Exodus:

{30:22} And the Lord spoke to Moses,
{30:23} saying: “Take for yourself aromatics: of the first and best myrrh, five hundred shekels, and of cinnamon half as much, that is, two hundred and fifty shekels; of sweet flag similarly two hundred and fifty,
{30:24} but of cassia, five hundred shekels by the weight of the sanctuary, and of the oil of olives the measure of a hin.
{30:25} And you shall make the holy oil of unction, an ointment composed with the skills of a perfumer,
{30:26} and with it you shall anoint the tabernacle of the testimony, and the ark of the testament,

{30:37} You shall not make such a compound for your own uses, because it is holy to the Lord.
{30:38} Whatever man will have made anything similar, so as to thoroughly enjoy its smell, he shall perish from his people.”

Is this an Old Testament discipline that we have been released from, or should we avoid the use of biblical oils that are designated as holy?
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Old 6th February 2010, 01:07 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacredcello View Post
Is this an Old Testament discipline that we have been released from, or should we avoid the use of biblical oils that are designated as holy?

It is a discipline that is no longer in force. The equivalent sin today would be, for example, making little unleavened hosts and then eating them (unconsecreted) in your home. Or making some of the same types of chrisms used for Sacraments, but for some profane use. The passage teaches a distinction between holy and profane.

I think that the medical basis for the use of essential oils to treat illness is very limited. I don't think there is any spiritual basis for this practice.
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Old 6th February 2010, 07:47 PM
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Thank you, Ron. I appreciate your analogy.

It is the anti-microbial properties of the biblical oils that are of interest to me, since I have suffered from the consequences of pharmaceuticals which do more harm than good.

Therapeutic Properties

The oleo gum resins produced by trees such as frankincense, myrrh, pine, spruce, fir, and others are a major part of the trees immune system. Tree sap has antibiotic and antifungal properties which protect the tree from infections, wound-healing properties for closing and regenerating the bark, and pheromone-like signaling mechanisms for repelling insect attackers and attracting the attacker’s natural predators. When humans use oleo gum resins or essential oils derived from trees, we are utilizing the molecular components of the trees immune system to boost our own. The general functions of frankincense resin and essential oil can therefore be described as immune-enhancing; antibiotic, antifungal, antiviral, and antiseptic; and wound-healing, with pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. Below is a brief list of the most important therapeutic applications of frankincense, which is by no means complete; the uses of frankincense are so numerous that it can accurately be described as a panacea, used for everything from colds to cancers. Since the resin is widely used for chewing, it can be assumed that it is not toxic to humans; however, use of the essential oil must be guided by appropriate precautions.
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Old 6th February 2010, 08:03 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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You might be interested in what Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich says on this topic. She mentions various herbs and oil and the like that had medicinal or healthful effects in some of her writings.


Both her books
The Dolorous Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ
and
The Life of the Blessed Virgin Mary
are now available as a free download from my site.

http://www.catholicplanet.com/ebooks/index.htm
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Old 6th February 2010, 09:33 PM
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Thank you, Ron. I will download and read those works.

I might also add there is a difference between therapeutic grade essential oils and the kind used only for perfume.
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Old 7th February 2010, 02:30 PM
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Ron,
That download is very generous of you , since I paid a lot of money for them from the publisher. Thank you. I have found these books very edifying.
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Old 9th February 2010, 04:33 AM
daytonafreak daytonafreak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacredcello View Post
Is this an Old Testament discipline that we have been released from, or should we avoid the use of biblical oils that are designated as holy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
It is a discipline that is no longer in force. The equivalent sin today would be, for example, making little unleavened hosts and then eating them (unconsecreted) in your home. Or making some of the same types of chrisms used for Sacraments, but for some profane use. The passage teaches a distinction between holy and profane.

Ron, this brings to mind a question I had. Is it okay to burn church incense for private use in homes? I don't mean incense that is blessed, but for example, buying an incense burner and some Eucharistic benediction incense over the internet and burning it while I pray? How about just burning some of the incense for the smell? (again I mean Incense that is not blessed) (I love the smell of it, by the way) The reason I ask this is because I saw a post about it on another forum and the people were saying we shouldn't do it, or at least, only burn it while we pray.
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Old 9th February 2010, 11:51 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daytonafreak View Post
Ron, this brings to mind a question I had. Is it okay to burn church incense for private use in homes? I don't mean incense that is blessed, but for example, buying an incense burner and some Eucharistic benediction incense over the internet and burning it while I pray? How about just burning some of the incense for the smell? (again I mean Incense that is not blessed) (I love the smell of it, by the way) The reason I ask this is because I saw a post about it on another forum and the people were saying we shouldn't do it, or at least, only burn it while we pray.
You could burn regular incense.

In my opinion, it would not be right to use Eucharistic benediction incense, or similar incense that is specifically designed for church use, in your home. The OT prohibition against making certain types of compounds used in worship is not in force as an OT discipline, but it is in force as a teaching -- we must separate the sacred from the profane.

There must be a clear distinction between ordained persons and non-ordained persons, between ordained roles and non-ordained roles, between sanctuary and marketplace (Jn 2:14-16). The foundation of this separation, the reason for its existence, is the distinction between God and Creation. This primary distinction is reflected in the separation between sacred and profane.

This is also why people should not turn their homes into little chapels or churches, and why priests and religious should dress differently, and why certain lay persons' roles at Mass are called 'extraordinary', etc.
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Old 9th February 2010, 05:27 PM
daytonafreak daytonafreak is offline
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Thanks Ron for the informative answer.
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Old 10th February 2010, 05:45 AM
garabandalg garabandalg is offline
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Default Just wondering

I wonder if reading the long form of the St. Michael exorcism immediately before or immediately after the Warning would have any particular value beyond the usual value of such things?
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