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  #1  
Old 4th May 2010, 07:24 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default the three pillars of truth

In the Catholic Faith, there are three sources of truth:
Sacred Tradition
Sacred Scripture
and the Magisterium

Tradition and Scripture together constitute the Sacred Deposit of Faith, also called Divine Revelation. All the truths taught by Tradition and Scripture are the teachings of God, divinely-revealed.

The Magisterium teaches from Tradition and Scripture, and also from natural law. But all the truths of natural law are also found in Tradition and Scripture. So every teaching of the Magisterium is found in the Deposit of Faith (Tradition and Scripture).
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Old 20th May 2010, 03:34 PM
Climacus Areopagite Climacus Areopagite is offline
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Ron I could not find any recent threads on Sacred Tradition so I just posted this here.

I found an interesting sequence in Pope Benedicts memoirs supporting your ideas on Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture as well as sort of showing some of the history leading up to Dei Verbum.

Pope Benedict wrote one of his dissertation's on Saint Bonaventure's model of Revelation. Here is the quote from the memoirs:

"in Bonaventure (as well as in theologians of the thirteenth century) there was nothing corresponding to our conception of "revelation", by which we are normally in the habit of referring to all the revealed contents of the faith: it has even become a part of linguistic usage to refer to Sacred Scripture simply as "revelation". Such an identification would have been unthinkable in the language of the High Middle Ages. Here "revelation" is always a concept denoting an act. The word refers to the act in which God shows himself, not to the objectified result of this act. And because this is so, the receiving subject is always also a part of the concept of "revelation". . . These insights, gained through my reading Bonaventure, were later on very important for me at the time of the conciliar discussion on revelation, Scripture, and tradition. Because, if Bonaventure is right, then revelation precedes Scripture and becomes deposited in Scripture but is not simply identical with it. This is turn means that revelation is always something greater than what is merely written down."


And so Dei Verbum teaches Divine Revelation is the deeds and words wrought and written by God in the history of salvation.

The deeds of God especially the deeds of Christ are primary. They are the unprincipled principle of Revelation. The concrete and salvific acts of God in history precede and beget Sacred Scripture. And together the deeds (Tradition) and words (Scripture) form one Sacred Deposit of Faith.
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Old 24th May 2010, 10:55 PM
Agobard
 
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where is nature, reality? where is good philosophy and science? can we say that they do not give us truth? fides et ratio - and what with ratio? isn't that true that in catholic faith there is need to accept the truth that comes from understanding of reality?
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Old 24th May 2010, 11:17 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agobard View Post
where is nature, reality? where is good philosophy and science? can we say that they do not give us truth? fides et ratio - and what with ratio? isn't that true that in catholic faith there is need to accept the truth that comes from understanding of reality?

Yes, as Catholics we live by faith and reason (ratio), not by faith alone, not by reason alone.

Tradition and Scripture are Divine Revelation, as a source of truth. The Magisterium teaches from Tradition and Scripture, but also from natural law, which is understood by reason. Also, the faithful use the virtue of faith (and the other virtues) as well as reason in order to accept and understand the teachings of Tradition, Scripture, Magisterium.

The understanding of reality, as you said, is based on faith and reason, for TSM teaches us about reality, about God, humanity, nature, etc.
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