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  #1  
Old 5th January 2010, 02:58 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default Which sins are mortal?

Saint Thomas Aquinas: "Therefore when the soul is so disordered by sin as to turn away from its last end, viz. God, to Whom it is united by charity, there is mortal sin; but when it is disordered without turning away from God, there is venial sin."
St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica, I-II, Q. 72, A. 5.

Pope John Paul II: "And when through sin, the soul commits a disorder that reaches the point of turning away from its ultimate end, God, to which it is bound by charity, then the sin is mortal; on the other hand, whenever the disorder does not reach the point of a turning away from God, the sin is venial. For this reason venial sin does not deprive the sinner of sanctifying grace, friendship with God, charity and therefore eternal happiness, whereas just such a deprivation is precisely the consequence of mortal sin."
Pope John Paul II, Reconciliation and Penance, n. 17.

The matter is grave if your intention, or the act itself by its very nature, or the consequences of your act, do grave harm or constitute a grave disorder.

A grave intention is any intention that is thoroughly contrary to love of God, neighbor, self.

A gravely disordered act (an intrinsically evil and gravely immoral act) has a moral object (the end toward which the act itself is inherently directed) that is thoroughly contrary to love of God, neighbor, self.

The consequences are grave if the harm or disorder resulting from the act (reasonably anticipated at the time that the act was chosen) outweighs the good done by the act, to an extent that is thoroughly contrary to love of God, neighbor, self.

If any one font of morality (intention, moral object, circumstances) is gravely disordered, then the entire act is a grave matter and an objective mortal sin. The other two fonts, if good, cannot reform the act to make it moral, nor to make it only a venial sin.
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Old 5th January 2010, 03:48 PM
zouxi zouxi is offline
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Thank you Ron for the great thread..I hereby have a question:

Does it mean that every intrinsic evil act results a mortal sin? does it mean also that a venial sin can't be a result of an intrinsic act because the act itself drags the author away from the bound of love to god?
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Old 5th January 2010, 04:20 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zouxi View Post
Thank you Ron for the great thread..I hereby have a question:

Does it mean that every intrinsic evil act results a mortal sin? does it mean also that a venial sin can't be a result of an intrinsic act because the act itself drags the author away from the bound of love to god?

Some intrinsically evil acts are mortal sins.
Some intrinsically evil acts are venial sins.
Some sins are mortal sins, but not intrinsically evil.
Some sins are venial sins, but not intrinsically evil.
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Old 5th January 2010, 04:28 PM
zouxi zouxi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Some intrinsically evil acts are mortal sins.
Some intrinsically evil acts are venial sins.
Some sins are mortal sins, but not intrinsically evil.
Some sins are venial sins, but not intrinsically evil.

Thank you, so an act being intrinsically evil or not doesn't mean that a venial or no.

Thanks again Ron for your prompt and valuable reply.
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Old 6th January 2010, 12:40 AM
Shane Shane is offline
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I'll try to give examples, if that's ok.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Some intrinsically evil acts are mortal sins.
Abortion, Homosexual acts, euthanasia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Some intrinsically evil acts are venial sins.
Certain forms of lying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Some sins are mortal sins, but not intrinsically evil.
This would entail grave matter. I would say apostasy or grave formal heresy, but I'm not certain on this one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Some sins are venial sins, but not intrinsically evil.


Getting overly angry at someone and calling them harsh names.
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  #6  
Old 6th January 2010, 01:10 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Some intrinsically evil acts are mortal sins:
murder, abortion, adultery, lust, malice, apostasy, heresy, schism, blasphemy, etc.

Some intrinsically evil acts are venial sins:
lying and theft are intrinsically evil, but may be mortal or venial.
Some lies and some acts of theft are venial, if the matter is not grave, such as a lie in a small matter, or theft of an item of small value.

Some sins are mortal sins, but not intrinsically evil:
1. a good act, done with gravely immoral intent;
e.g. preaching the Gospel, so as to gain money or power in the Church

2. a good act, done with reasonably anticipated gravely harmful consequences;
e.g. correcting your employer for a small sin that he committed, but with the anticipated consequence that you will lose your job and be unable to support your family

Some sins are venial sins, and not intrinsically evil:
such as going to Mass, but being inattentive and leaving early.
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Old 6th January 2010, 01:50 PM
js1975 js1975 is offline
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Ron, thanks.

These are objective definitions, meaning they are very clear and each person is judged according to their act, intent, and resulting consequences. But what do you think about when someone's perspective is too harsh, resulting in being too harsh on themselves. While a particular act and intent may be considered minor, the person at hand is extremely harsh on themselves which results in them turning away from God. (I assume this is possible)

It seems to me that it would be two separate sins. The first being the original venial sin (A small lie or leaving mass early). The second sin being the harshness on themselves. If they would be harsh enough to turn away from God, then it would be the second sin that would be so severe as to become a mortal sin.

Would this be correct?

thanks,
jay
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Old 6th January 2010, 02:54 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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I'm not sure what you mean by too harsh on themselves.
I person might commit a venial sin and then mistakenly think that the sin was mortal. But this mistake is not a sin, certainly not a mortal sin.
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Old 6th January 2010, 05:42 PM
js1975 js1975 is offline
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There are people in my life who commit very minor faults, yet beat themselves up endlessly over the sin. I had these types of people in mind when I asked the question. I am sure I too fall into this trap from time to time as well. By becoming preoccupied by a fault, you fail to perform properly in other duties.

I guess what I was getting to is that regardless of what someone may thing of their sin, their opinion does not equal the truth. In turn, by taking any minor faults and trying to make them a big fault, it is another sin all together.
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Old 6th January 2010, 06:10 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by js1975 View Post
In turn, by taking any minor faults and trying to make them a big fault, it is another sin all together.

Yes, it may be objectively a sin, but generally such a sin would be venial.
Also, it is possible for such a fault to be an imperfection, and not a sin at all.
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