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  #1  
Old 1st June 2009, 12:25 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default TS 30b: Council of Trent continued

CHAPTER VI.
On reserving the Sacrament of the sacred Eucharist, and bearing it to the Sick.

The custom of reserving the holy Eucharist in the sacrarium [tabernacle] is so ancient, that even the age of the Council of Nicaea recognised that usage. Moreover, as to carrying the sacred Eucharist itself to the sick, and carefully reserving it for this purpose in churches, besides that it is exceedingly conformable to equity and reason, it is also found enjoined in numerous councils, and is a very ancient observance of the Catholic Church. Wherefore, this holy Synod ordains, that this salutary and necessary custom is to be by all means retained.

CHAPTER VII.
On the preparation to be given that one may worthily receive the sacred Eucharist.

If it is unbeseeming for any one to approach to any of the sacred functions, unless he approach holily; assuredly, the more the holiness and divinity of this heavenly sacrament are understood by a Christian, the more diligently ought he to give heed that he approach not to receive it but with great reverence and holiness, especially as we read in the Apostle those words full of terror; He that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh judgment to himself. Wherefore, he who would communicate, ought to recall to mind the precept of the Apostle; Let a man prove himself. Now ecclesiastical usage declares that necessary proof to be, that no one, conscious to himself of mortal sin, how contrite soever he may seem to himself, ought to approach to the sacred Eucharist without previous sacramental confession. This the holy Synod hath decreed is to be invariably observed by all Christians, even by those priests on whom it may be incumbent by their office to celebrate, provided the opportunity of a confessor do not fail them; but if, in an urgent necessity, a priest should celebrate without previous confession, let him confess as soon as possible.

[This is still the practice today, although a layperson who is conscious of mortal sin may, for a grave reason, still receive Communion if he says an act of perfect contrition (sorrow for sin out of love for God and neighbor).]
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Old 3rd June 2009, 12:03 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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CHAPTER VIII.
On the use of this admirable Sacrament.

Now as to the use of this holy sacrament, our Fathers have rightly and wisely distinguished three ways of receiving it.

[1] For they have taught that some receive it sacramentally only, to wit sinners:

[2] others spiritually only, those to wit who eating in desire that heavenly bread which is set before them, are, by a lively faith which worketh by charity, made sensible of the fruit and usefulness thereof:

[3] whereas the third (class) receive it both sacramentally and spiritually, and these are they who so prove and prepare themselves beforehand, as to approach to this divine table clothed with the wedding garment.

Now as to the reception of the sacrament, it was always the custom in the Church of God, that laymen should receive the communion from priests; but that priests when celebrating should communicate themselves; which custom, as coming down from an apostolical tradition, ought with justice and reason to be retained.

And finally this holy Synod with true fatherly affection admonishes, exhorts, begs, and beseeches, through the bowels of the mercy of our God, that all and each of those who bear the Christian name would now at length agree and be of one mind in this sign of unity, in this bond of charity, in this symbol of concord; and that mindful of the so great majesty, and the so exceeding love of our Lord Jesus Christ, who gave His own beloved soul as the price of our salvation, and gave us His own flesh to eat, they would believe and venerate these sacred mysteries of His body and blood with such constancy and firmness of faith, with such devotion of soul, with such piety and worship as to be able frequently to receive that supersubstantial bread, and that it may be to them truly the life of the soul, and the perpetual health of their mind; that being invigorated by the strength thereof, they may, after the journeying of this miserable pilgrimage, be able to arrive at their heavenly country, there to eat, without any veil, that same bread of angels which they now eat under the sacred veils.

[Matthew]
{6:11} Panem nostrum supersubstantialem da nobis hodie.
{6:11} Give us this day our life-sustaining bread.

Laypersons are not the ordinary ministers of holy Communion. They are currently permitted to distribute Communion only because of the shortage of priests (which has gone on for so long that few persons even recognize that there is a shortage). There is no right to be an extraordinary minister of holy Communion.

The three ways of receiving Communion:

[1] unworthiliy, in body only, i.e. without faith, so that those who eat are condemned by not believing that the communion host is Christ

[2] a spiritual only Communion, for those who are on occasion unable to receive the Sacrament; they can make a spiritual Communion by meditating on Christ and His Presence in the Eucharist and His sacrifice on the Cross

[3] worthiliy, in body and spirit, so that we receive the host into our body but also communicate spiritually.
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  #3  
Old 4th June 2009, 11:50 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Any questions on making a spiritual communion?
Have any member done this?
This is an excellent way when one cannot get to Mass or Communion for some reason.
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Old 4th June 2009, 12:01 PM
sammy sammy is offline
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Generally, how much time does one prepare for spiritual communion and does one need to act with form such as sticking out one's tongue? Sammy.
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Old 4th June 2009, 01:41 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Spiritual communion consists of interior prayer and of meditation on Christ's presence in the Eucharist, and of Christ's presence in our own soul (since we are in a state of grace). There is no need to pretend as if we were receiving a host on the tongue. This interior meditation may last only a few minutes, or we may continue for some length of time, such as a half hour or more.

Act of Spiritual Communion
Saint Alphonsus Maria de Liguori

My Jesus, I believe that Thou art present in the Blessed Sacrament. I love Thee above all things and I desire Thee in my soul. Since I cannot now receive Thee sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. As though thou wert already there, I embrace Thee and unite myself wholly to Thee; permit not that I should ever be separated from Thee.
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Old 5th June 2009, 01:11 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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CANON I.-If any one denieth, that, in the sacrament of the most holy Eucharist, are contained truly, really, and substantially, the body and blood together with the soul and divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ, and consequently the whole Christ; but saith that He is only therein as in a sign, or in figure, or virtue; let him be anathema.

[This is the dogma of the Real Presence, which is a required belief for all Catholics. Some surveys show that a large percentage of Catholics are in a state of material heresy on this teaching.]

CANON lI.-If any one saith, that, in the sacred and holy sacrament of the Eucharist, the substance of the bread and wine remains conjointly with the body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, and denieth that wonderful and singular conversion of the whole substance of the bread into the Body, and of the whole substance of the wine into the Blood-the species Only of the bread and wine remaining-which conversion indeed the Catholic Church most aptly calls Transubstantiation; let him be anathema.

[The terminology used to describe this dogma is non-essential. The teaching existed long before the term transubstantiation was invented. Terminology is not teaching. The term is useful, but not essential.

The substance of the bread and wine are changed into the substance of the physical part of the human nature of Christ, and his soul and Divinity are also present. All that remains of the bread and wine are the outward appearances.

The idea that Jesus was present in the Eucharist with the bread and wine cojointly was proposed by Martin Luther; this idea is a heresy.]

CANON III.-If any one denieth, that, in the venerable sacrament of the Eucharist, the whole Christ is contained under each species, and under every part of each species, when separated; let him be anathema.



CANON IV.-If any one saith, that, after the consecration is completed, the body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ are not in the admirable sacrament of the Eucharist, but (are there) only during the use, whilst it is being taken, and not either before or after; and that, in the hosts, or consecrated particles, which are reserved or which remain after communion, the true Body of the Lord remaineth not; let him be anathema.

[Thus, we adore the Eucharist when it is in the tabernacle, or displayed on a monstrance. This Sacrament is unique in that the Sacrament is not merely found in its use, since Christ is truly present.]
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  #7  
Old 5th June 2009, 02:36 PM
js1975 js1975 is offline
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No, I was not aware of this at all. When you made that post was the first day I had performed a spiritual communion.
-john
__________________
2cor 7:1 Therefore, having these promises, most beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all defilement of the flesh and of the spirit, perfecting sanctification in the fear of God.
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Old 21st June 2009, 04:06 AM
Therese Therese is offline
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Yes,I have made a spiritual communion,it is very effective when one is unable to attend mass
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Old 23rd June 2009, 12:06 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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CHAPTER II.
On the difference between the Sacrament of Penance and that of Baptism

For the rest, this sacrament is clearly seen to be different from baptism in many respects:

1. for besides that it is very widely different indeed in matter and form, which constitute the essence of a sacrament, it is beyond doubt certain that the minister of baptism need not be a judge, seeing that the Church exercises judgment on no one who has not entered therein through the gate of baptism. For, what have I, saith the apostle, to do to judge them that are without? It is otherwise with those who are of the household of the faith, whom Christ our Lord has once, by the laver of baptism, made the members of His own body; for such, if they should afterwards have defiled themselves by any crime, He would no longer have them cleansed by a repetition of baptism--that being nowise lawful in the Catholic Church-but be placed as criminals before this tribunal; that, by the sentence of the priests, they might be freed, not once, but as often as, being penitent, they should, from their sins committed, flee thereunto.

2. Furthermore, one is the fruit of baptism, and another that of penance. For, by baptism putting on Christ, we are made therein entirely a new creature, obtaining a full and entire remission of all sins: unto which newness and entireness, however, we are no ways able to arrive by the sacrament of Penance, without many tears and great labours on our parts, the divine justice demanding this; so that penance has justly been called by holy Fathers a laborious kind of baptism. And this sacrament of Penance is, for those who have fallen after baptism, necessary unto salvation; as baptism itself is for those who have not as yet been regenerated.

[Baptism of some kind is absolutely necessary for salvation. Confession is both similar to Baptism, and different from it, in many ways.]
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Old 29th June 2009, 12:02 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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CHAPTER III.
On the parts, and on the fruit of this Sacrament.

The holy synod doth furthermore teach, that the form of the sacrament of penance, wherein its force principally consists, is placed in those words of the minister, I absolve thee, etc: to which words indeed certain prayers are, according to the custom of holy Church, laudably joined, which nevertheless by no means regard the essence of that form, neither are they necessary for the administration of the sacrament itself.

But the acts of the penitent himself, to wit, contrition, confession and satisfaction, are as it were the matter of this sacrament. Which acts, inasmuch as they are, by God's institution, required in the penitent for the integrity of the sacrament, and for the full and perfect remission of sins, are for this reason called the parts of penance.

[If you are not contrite, i.e. repentant, then you are not forgiven. The term 'satisfaction' refers to penance. If you do not do penance, you are still forgiven for the sin, but not for the punishment due for the sin.]

But the thing signified indeed and the effect of this sacrament, as far as regards its force and efficacy, is reconciliation with God, which sometimes, in persons who are pious and who receive this sacrament with devotion, is wont to be followed by peace and serenity of conscience, with exceeding consolation of spirit. The holy Synod, whilst delivering these things touching the parts and the effect of this sacrament, condemns at the same time the opinions of those who contend, that, the terrors which agitate the conscience, and faith, are the parts of penance. [This last part refutes a Protestant error, which holds that confession is not needed, only faith is needed, and conscience.]
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