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  #11  
Old 4th April 2007, 01:06 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Originally Posted by llazcano13 View Post
Are diocesan Sinods of Bishops like a local council for non infallibility discussions?

Local groups of Bishops, and Bishops Conferences, cannot teach infallibly; they can only teach non-infallibly. They can reiterate doctrinal definitions, but they cannot arrive at a new definition of doctrine.
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  #12  
Old 4th April 2007, 04:18 AM
themilitantcatholic
 
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Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
There are still some Protestants asking when the Catholic Church will renounce the 'errors' of the Council of Trent (answer: never, they are not errors).


What 'errors' are the Protestants speaking of?
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  #13  
Old 4th April 2007, 11:14 AM
Rob Rob is offline
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Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Many Councils were prompted by serious problems in the Church, especially widespead heresy or widespread confusion on important points of doctrine. I don't know if there is any pressure to have a Council. It is the work of the Spirit.

Yes, it's true. When someone doubts some truths or there is heresy, usually the Spirit issues one or more infallible teachings. Think about Boniface VIII who infallibly said that "Furthermore, we declare, we proclaim, we define that it is absolutely necessary for salvation that every human creature be subject to the Roman Pontiff". If it weren't for king Philip of France defiant behaviour, the pope would have probably never issued the bull.
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  #14  
Old 4th April 2007, 11:24 AM
Love The Fisherman
 
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Default Authority And Ex-Communication

Hi Ron,
Can You Explain Exactly What Happens When Some One Is Excommunicated. Are They "Dead" Like Adam And Eve In The Garden After The Fall? And Could You Explain A Bit About Automatic Ex-Communication Please? Thanks.
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  #15  
Old 4th April 2007, 01:07 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Originally Posted by Love The Fisherman View Post
Hi Ron,
Can You Explain Exactly What Happens When Some One Is Excommunicated. Are They "Dead" Like Adam And Eve In The Garden After The Fall? And Could You Explain A Bit About Automatic Ex-Communication Please? Thanks.

There are two types of excommunication:

1. ferendae sententiae excommunication

the phrase "ferendae sententiae" means a judgment or sentence which will be brought after a future judgment by competent authority. This type of excommunication is given in particular cases by a Bishop or the Holy See and is not automatic.

2. latae sententiae excommunication

The phrase "latae sententiae" means a judgment or sentence which has already been brought, in other words, a sentence or judgment which does not need a future additional judgment from someone in authority; it refers to a type of excommunication which is automatic. Such a sentence of excommunication is incurred "by the very commission of the offense," (CCC 2272) and does not require the future particular judgment of a case by competent authority.

Apostasy, heresy, and schism are all offences which incur a sentence of excommunication automatically.

When someone is excommunicated, they may not receive the Sacraments (except confession, if they have repented from their sin; usually a Bishop must be the one to remove the excommunication, but Bishops often delegate this authority to some priests in the diocese).

Someone who is excommunicated might still be in a state of grace. Usually, one is excommunicated for committing particular kinds of objective mortal sin, but the individual might not be in a state of actual mortal sin. Also, some persons might possibly be given a ferendae excommunication unjustly, such as Saint Joan of Arc, who died under an unjust sentence of excommunication.

So excommunication does not mean that the individual is not in a state of grace (although thay may be the case), and it does not mean that the individual necessarily goes to Hell.
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  #16  
Old 4th April 2007, 01:09 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Originally Posted by themilitantcatholic View Post
What 'errors' are the Protestants speaking of?

They object to the Council of Trent's teaching on transsubstantiation, and probably also on the Sacraments and the inspired books of the Bible (teaching that the deuterocanonical books are also inspired).
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  #17  
Old 4th April 2007, 01:58 PM
Justin Angel Justin Angel is offline
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Wink Vatican ll

Ron, what were the key issues that led the 'sede vacantists' to leave the Church?
Did they concern changes in the Mass? Discarding Latin as the vernacular language
of the Mass, for instance?
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  #18  
Old 4th April 2007, 02:36 PM
Lee
 
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Ron, can you say more about a certain faction not believing there is an exsisting Pope since Vatican II?
Lee
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  #19  
Old 4th April 2007, 03:53 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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I don't want to go into too much detail on the positions of the sede vacantists. There are numerous splinter groups with similar but differing positions, who reject Vatican II.

Basically, they do not agree with the statements on ecumenism, on the good found within other faiths, on the possibility of salvation for non-Catholics. They reject the emphasis in Vatican II on reforming the Mass, instead claiming that the form of the Mass is immutable. They reject the use of the venacular. They hold that the approval of these teachings constitutes a heresy which automatically removes the Pope from his office as Supreme Teacher of the Faith. They may perhaps have other quarrels with Vatican II.

In my view, the Popes are incapable of committing the sin of heresy because the fullness of the gift of the Magisterium is given to them. The other Bishops share in that gift of the Magisterium, but only the Pope possesses that gift to such an extent that he can never fall into heresy.
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  #20  
Old 4th April 2007, 05:09 PM
Bomber
 
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If someone is a cafeteria catholic, in the sense that they have gotten married outside the Church, without approval, is not raising their kids as Catholics because his Baptist wife is anti-Catholic, believes that he is still Catholic even though he doesn't think he is sinning... and still goes to Communion every few months (he goes to his wife's church usually to make her happy)...

Is he in a state of heresy?

Is he in a state of actual mortal sin?

Is he excommunicated?
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