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  #21  
Old 4th April 2007, 06:47 PM
CRW
 
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In most cases, marriage outside of the Catholic Church is not considered valid. It would take little effort to have his marriage convalidated. But there is always a condition that must be met by both. No divorce for either, unless annulment process has been approved.

As far as I can determine, there is no “Legal” requirement to raise your Children Catholic that would prevent you from receiving Holy Communion.

No to excommunicate. If all Catholic that committed grave or serious sins were excommunicated, we would be a very small Church.

No one really knows, except the individual and his wife, if they have received the Church blessings. There is a procedure that the husband or wife can have their marriage convalidated without the other’s approval, it is rare, and for the life of me, I cannot locate the term.

Pray for his full conversion. If a family member or friend, I would have a discussion concerning the matter. I know of Catholic Police who report any suspicious person to the pastor, but I would not suggest that option.

I found this as a reference:

Answer by Rev. Mark J. Gantley, JCL on 11-14-2006:
Because a couple in an invalid marriage have some semblance of commitment, it is considered somewhat less than "living in sin." It is, however, still an invalid marriage and individuals in that situation are not permitted to receive the sacraments.
If a Catholic was living in an invalid marriage due to defect of form (i.e., that the marriage did not take place in the Catholic Church), and he or she leaves that marriage and goes to confession, then he or she may go to Holy Communion and is free to date and marry in the future.

Cecil
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  #22  
Old 4th April 2007, 06:55 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bomber View Post
If someone is a cafeteria catholic, in the sense that they have gotten married outside the Church, without approval, is not raising their kids as Catholics because his Baptist wife is anti-Catholic, believes that he is still Catholic even though he doesn't think he is sinning... and still goes to Communion every few months (he goes to his wife's church usually to make her happy)...

Is he in a state of heresy?

Is he in a state of actual mortal sin?

Is he excommunicated?

If he obstinately doubts or refuses to believe any of the definitive teachings of the Catholic Faith, then he would be in a state of heresy.

You cannot tell if it is an actual mortal sin, because you cannot judge his soul. His actions, as you describe them, are objective sins.

All schismatics, heretics, and apostates are under a sentence of automatic excommunication from Canon Law.

He should probably not be receiving Communion at all, if he does not believe and practice the Catholic faith. But my advice to you is to let him be, and see if he accepts correction from God in the time ahead.

I think that, soon enough, the Church will clarify and strengthen the rules for who can receive Communion and who can claim to be Catholic.


Ron
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  #23  
Old 4th April 2007, 08:24 PM
Paladin
 
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Default Cafeteria Catholic

In an almost identical situation that I know of, the parish priest told the man that he was not allowed to receive the sacrament of Reconciliation. He is not currently receiving the Eucharist, so that is not an issue.

Is this correct instruction? If so, would that be because the man is living in a state of sin, not actively trying to change his situation, and therefore would not be cleansed of his sins? I thought confession was more or less open to all.
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  #24  
Old 4th April 2007, 08:29 PM
CRW
 
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The priest is correct. Until he corrects the grave matter, he is not allowed the sacraments.

Cecil
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  #25  
Old 4th April 2007, 08:31 PM
Paladin
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CRW View Post
The priest is correct. Until he corrects the grave matter, he is not allowed the sacraments.

Cecil

Thanks for the reply.
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  #26  
Old 4th April 2007, 08:54 PM
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latae sententiae excommunication

Another example: One who obtains or procures abortion.

Cecil
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  #27  
Old 4th April 2007, 09:15 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CRW View Post
The priest is correct. Until he corrects the grave matter, he is not allowed the sacraments.

Cecil

I disagree.

It cannot be said, by any of us in this forum, that the particular person in question is to be denied Confession. A priest is not prohibited from hearing the confession of a sinner who is repentant from one sin, but not from another.

A priest might refuse someone confession if he perceives that the person is not repentant from any sin, but I would expect most priests to err on the side of their concern for all souls and give confession even to a hardened sinner.

Cecil, do not answer questions in this forum unless you are sure of the answer.
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  #28  
Old 4th April 2007, 11:20 PM
CRW
 
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Ron is 110 percent correct; one should not judge another’s person right to confession (unless one is in authority to do so) and when one states a position, he should back it up with a Church document. I based the initial response on the priest position, the one most knowledgeable with the individual and his state in life. I post the below, not in defense, but to denote that the Church has the authority to admit individuals to the sacraments. Conon Law 915 may also apply.

APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
FAMILIARIS CONSORTIO
OF POPE
JOHN PAUL II
TO THE EPISCOPATE
TO THE CLERGY AND TO THE FAITHFUL
OF THE WHOLE CATHOLIC CHURCH
ON THE ROLE
OF THE CHRISTIAN FAMILY
IN THE MODERN WORLD
82. There are increasing cases of Catholics who for ideological or practical reasons, prefer to contract a merely civil marriage, and who reject or at least defer religious marriage. Their situation cannot of course be likened to that of people simply living together without any bond at all, because in the present case there is at least a certain commitment to a properly-defined and probably stable state of life, even though the possibility of a future divorce is often present in the minds of those entering a civil marriage. By seeking public recognition of their bond on the part of the State, such couples show that they are ready to accept not only its advantages but also its obligations. Nevertheless, not even this situation is acceptable to the Church.
The aim of pastoral action will be to make these people understand the need for consistency between their choice of life and the faith that they profess, and to try to do everything possible to induce them to regularize their situation in the light of Christian principle. While treating them with great charity and bringing them into the life of the respective communities, the pastors of the Church will regrettably not be able to admit them to the sacraments.
If I offended anyone on this forum, the Administrator, or provided erroneous information, my sincere apology.
Cecil
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  #29  
Old 5th April 2007, 12:31 PM
Padraig
 
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I must say I am impressed, you all seem to know your stuff. I always had the impression that councils had two main drifts either pastoral or dogmatic. For instance Vatican ii was pastoral and Vatican ! was Dogmatic and Trent was a mixture? Don't mind me I am only rambling to show I passed this way.
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  #30  
Old 5th April 2007, 01:09 PM
trswago trswago is offline
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Default who can claim tobe Catholic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post

I think that, soon enough, the Church will clarify and strengthen the rules for who can receive Communion and who can claim to be Catholic.


Ron

I think soon enough will not be that soon.........maybe next Pope?
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