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  #1  
Old 5th January 2007, 01:48 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default Sins of Omission

Many examinations of conscience (EC) omit sins of omission.

[James]
{4:17} Therefore, he who knows that he ought to do a good thing, and does not do it, for him it is a sin.

Examples of sins of omission:

not praying for the members of one's family
including one's extended family and family members in purgatory

not praying for the holy souls in purgatory
"O you who know what we suffer here, do not forget us in your prayers."
(Tolkien)

not attending Mass
not going to confession often enough
not praying often enough
not helping those in need (recall the rich man and Lazarus)
not learning the Catholic Faith
not reading the Bible
not learning about and imitating the Saints

etc.



Ron
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  #2  
Old 23rd January 2007, 05:15 PM
Mario
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Many examinations of conscience (EC) omit sins of omission.

[James]
{4:17} Therefore, he who knows that he ought to do a good thing, and does not do it, for him it is a sin.

Examples of sins of omission:

not helping those in need (recall the rich man and Lazarus)

Ron

Ron,

The above is an example of the corporal works of mercy- with a personal touch!

This is my weak one. It is much easier for me to do the pious acts (good though they be), then to get off my duff and help my neighbor. So this Saturday, I'll take a load of wood to a friend to help keep his house warm! Thanks for the reminder.

Last edited by Mario : 23rd January 2007 at 05:17 PM.
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  #3  
Old 10th July 2007, 06:29 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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Many people who commit suicide (which is a sin by the way), is due to the omission of other people to help them in their times of need. So, in this case, the person who committed suicide may go to Purgatory (according to the circumstances) and the person who omitted the help may be in mortal sin?

Another question, are there venial and mortal sins of omission or they are all mortal?
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  #4  
Old 10th July 2007, 06:56 PM
trswago trswago is offline
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Default Straight to hell?

I don't know about this one ? I was always taught that to commit suicide would mean a direct shot straight to hell.


Many people who commit suicide (which is a sin by the way), is due to the omission of other people to help them in their times of need. So, in this case, the person who committed suicide may go to Purgatory (according to the circumstances) and the person who omitted the help may be in mortal sin?
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  #5  
Old 10th July 2007, 07:10 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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I've been told that, according to the circumstances, some go to Purgatory and others straight to Hell.
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  #6  
Old 10th July 2007, 07:28 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brother View Post
Many people who commit suicide (which is a sin by the way), is due to the omission of other people to help them in their times of need. So, in this case, the person who committed suicide may go to Purgatory (according to the circumstances) and the person who omitted the help may be in mortal sin?

Another question, are there venial and mortal sins of omission or they are all mortal?

If the person committing suicide is committing an actual mortal sin, then they go to Hell. If the culpability for the sin is lessened because the person did not realize how sinful suicide is, or they did not freely choose the suicide because of serious psychological impairment, then the culpability may be reduced such that it is only an actual venial sin (although it is still an objective mortal sin); in which case the person would go to Purgatory.

It has little to do with whether or not others have sinned by omission.

It is not really the circumstances, but the internal state of the one committing suicide which governs whether or not they are saved.

Additionally, if someone is not in a state of grace due to an unrepented prior actual mortal sin, and if they still do not repent, then they go to Hell for that sin even if the sin of suicide is reduced in culpability.


Ron
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  #7  
Old 10th July 2007, 08:42 PM
trswago trswago is offline
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Thanks Ron
But with that answer I have another question

Quote:
If the person committing suicide is committing an actual mortal sin, then they go to Hell. If the culpability for the sin is lessened because the person did not realize how sinful suicide is, or they did not freely choose the suicide because of serious psychological impairment, then the culpability may be reduced such that it is only an actual venial sin (although it is still an objective mortal sin); in which case the person would go to Purgatory.

If the sin is lessened because the person does not realize how sinful suicide is , than if a person does not realize the other types of sins, are they also lessened ?

trs
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  #8  
Old 10th July 2007, 09:35 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trswago View Post
Thanks Ron
But with that answer I have another question



If the sin is lessened because the person does not realize how sinful suicide is , than if a person does not realize the other types of sins, are they also lessened ?

trs

Yes, for any objective mortal sin, if the person does not realize that it is a serious sin, the culpability is lessened so that it would not be an actual mortal sin, but only venial.
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  #9  
Old 13th July 2007, 03:41 PM
garabandalg garabandalg is offline
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Default What about beggars and homeless people?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Many examinations of conscience (EC) omit sins of omission.

[James]
{4:17} Therefore, he who knows that he ought to do a good thing, and does not do it, for him it is a sin.

Examples of sins of omission:

not praying for the members of one's family
including one's extended family and family members in purgatory

not praying for the holy souls in purgatory
"O you who know what we suffer here, do not forget us in your prayers."
(Tolkien)

not attending Mass
not going to confession often enough
not praying often enough
not helping those in need (recall the rich man and Lazarus)
not learning the Catholic Faith
not reading the Bible
not learning about and imitating the Saints

etc.



Ron

One cannot walk in Manhattan for one hour without coming across at least one or two beggars or homeless people asking for money. Is it a sin of omission to not give them anything? Do we have to give a quarter or a dime to every beggar we see? I know what St Francis would have done but he was a great and legendary saint. I also know that we all have the potential to be like St. Francis with grace and commitment but it is not easy at all.

Suppose someone has passed 100 beggars in her lifetime and given money to 10. Would this be considered a serious sin? What if that person otherwise gave to charities etc. How is one to evaluate what to do?
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  #10  
Old 13th July 2007, 05:21 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garabandalg View Post
One cannot walk in Manhattan for one hour without coming across at least one or two beggars or homeless people asking for money. Is it a sin of omission to not give them anything? Do we have to give a quarter or a dime to every beggar we see? I know what St Francis would have done but he was a great and legendary saint. I also know that we all have the potential to be like St. Francis with grace and commitment but it is not easy at all.

Suppose someone has passed 100 beggars in her lifetime and given money to 10. Would this be considered a serious sin? What if that person otherwise gave to charities etc. How is one to evaluate what to do?

You do not have to give money to everyone who asks or who begs from you.
Your obligation is to address the needs of the poor, to some extent in your life according to your means.



Ron
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