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Old 18th April 2007, 12:40 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default TS 3: Introduction to the Magisterium

The Magisterium is not the Pope and the Bishops; it is a gift to the entire Church exercised, at times, by the Pope and the Bishops.

The Magisterium is not the sole authority possessed by the Church; the authority of the Church is two-fold:
1. the spiritual or teaching authority (i.e. the Magisterium)
2. the temporal authority (judgments of the prudential order)

Teachings fall under the Magisterium, the teaching authority of the Church. But decisions, rules, judgments, laws (other than the moral law) fall under the temporal authority of the Church.

The Pope is the successor to Peter; this is why he can exercise the teaching authority of the Church.

The Bishops are the successors to the other Apostles; therefore, they too can exercise the teaching authority of the Church.

Some persons incorrectly think that only the Pope can teach authoritatively, or that the Bishops role is merely to repeat the teaching of the Pope. Not true. Each Bishop is a true Apostle and has the ability and authority to exercise the Magisterium by virtue of his office as Bishop; he is not merely an assistant to the Pope.

The role of Cardinal is to assist the Pope in exercising the Pope's authority. Any authority given to a Cardinal by the Pope is temporary and revocable, and is a merely a participation in the Pope's authority. A Cardinal has no ground to stand on if he disagrees with the Pope on a matter of faith, morals, or temporal judgment. A Cardinal has no authority of his own; he participates in the Pope's authority.

However, the role of a Bishop as an Apostle is intrinsic to his ordination as a Bishop. If a Bishop disagrees with the Pope on a matter of faith, morals, or temporal judgment, the Bishop does have some ground to stand on; he is an Apostle ordained by God, not merely the assistant of the Pope. A Bishop has authority to make temporal decisions for his diocese and to exercise the ordinary non-infallible Magisterium, in and of himself, by virtue of his ordination to the Episcopate. A Bishop has authority of his own.

The Pope cannot prevent the Bishops as a body from participating in the teaching authority and temporal authority of the Church as true Apostles. The Pope has the authority to lead and correct the Bishops, but not to remove the body of Bishops from the role of Apostleship which they received at ordination.

Now an individual Bishop, if he departs from the true Faith, or from unity with the Pope or with the body of Bishops, can be removed by the authority of the Pope from his role as Apostle. But, while still faithful to the Church, a Bishop remains an Apostle in his own right.

The role of a priest is to assist the Bishop in exercising the Bishop's teaching and temporal authority. But any authority that a priest exercises as pastor of a parish is temporary and revocable; the authority that he exercises belongs to the Bishop, not to himself. A priest has no authority of his own; he participates in the Bishop's authority.

The structure of the Magisterium is that the Pope leads the body of Bishops just as Peter led the other Apostles. But the Bishops can teach and act authoritatively on their own. For the other Apostles went out to the whole world to preach the Gospel, they did not stay by Peter's side acting as mere assistants.
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  #2  
Old 18th April 2007, 02:30 AM
Mario
 
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Default Learning so much!

Ron,

Keep up the good work. I've got some personal issues that have come up so I won't be around as much. Just wanted to let you know I'll be checking in now and then, but posting infrequently.

God bless you richly!

In the Hearts of Jesus and Mary!
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  #3  
Old 18th April 2007, 02:45 AM
Joey Joey is offline
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Question Cardinal vs Bishop

But are you saying that a Bishop has more teaching clout than a Cardinal, who is only a 'mere assistant'? Were not the Cardinals first Bishops? The Pope, who was once a Cardinal, is still referred to as the Bishop of Rome, right? Just a little confused here; happens alot!
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  #4  
Old 18th April 2007, 03:12 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey View Post
But are you saying that a Bishop has more teaching clout than a Cardinal, who is only a 'mere assistant'? Were not the Cardinals first Bishops? The Pope, who was once a Cardinal, is still referred to as the Bishop of Rome, right? Just a little confused here; happens alot!

Cardinals are generally also Bishops, so we are talking about the role of a Cardinal, versus the role of a Bishop who is the head of a diocese.

A Cardinal is exercising the authority of the Pope, which is a higher authority than that of a Bishop. However, a Cardinal is not exercising his own authority, but the Pope's authority. A Bishop is exercising his own authority. A Bishop has a role with some degree of independence from the Pope; a Cardinal does not.

People often think that there is a heirarchy:
Pope
Cardinal
Bishop
Priest

But really the heirarchy is:
Pope assisted by Cardinals
Bishops assisted by priests
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  #5  
Old 18th April 2007, 10:13 AM
Joey Joey is offline
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Cool Got it!

Okay...that makes sense. Thank you, Ron.
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  #6  
Old 18th April 2007, 12:23 PM
MA MA is offline
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I was in the same boat ast Joey...now I understand better...

Questions:
The cardinals are only chosen by the Pope, right? is that why only Cardinals can choose a new Pope instead of Bishops and Cardinals?

thanks,

MA
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  #7  
Old 18th April 2007, 12:34 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MA View Post
I was in the same boat ast Joey...now I understand better...

Questions:
The cardinals are only chosen by the Pope, right? is that why only Cardinals can choose a new Pope instead of Bishops and Cardinals?

thanks,

MA

Yes, the Pope appoints Cardinals.

It is not essential to the Faith that only Cardinals choose a Pope.
The first Pope was chosen by Christ.
Subsequent Popes in the early Church, it is not clear how they were chosen; it may have been simply that whoever was the next Bishop of Rome was the Pope, without a formal election.
It is conceivable that a Pope could choose his successor, again, without a formal election.

I believe that the Pope after Peter the Roman will be chosen by Bishops and Cardinals, not by Cardinals alone. I have a couple of articles on this subject.

How the Pope is chosen, the particulars of the rules and procedures, is an example of the temporal authority of the Church, not the Magisterium. These rules can be changed from time to time, and can be dispensed with in extraordinary circumstances, because they are rules not teachings.

This distinction between teachings and rules, between the teaching authority and the temporal authority is very important. It is one of the main points that I would like to convey in the section.
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Old 18th April 2007, 02:16 PM
sammy sammy is offline
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Ron, once a cardinal always a cardinal? or do they revert back to bishops after their retirement or appointment? Sammy.
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  #9  
Old 18th April 2007, 02:16 PM
CRW
 
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Default The temporal authority (judgments of the prudential order)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
A Bishop has authority to make temporal decisions for his diocese and to exercise the ordinary non-infallible Magisterium, in and of himself, by virtue of his ordination to the Episcopate. A Bishop has authority of his own.

Ron,

Concerning the temporal authority (judgments of the prudential order) of bishops.

Is this authority absolute or limited to that authority granted by the Holy See. The USCCB, has authority when granted by the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM), to make changes. However, changes made require the approval of the Holy See. One example I can site: The GIRM required the priest, deacon, or acolyte to purify the blessed vessels after Holy Communion. The USCCB requested approval to allow EMHC to do the purification. A temporary approval was granted and expired. After numerous letters, the Holy See ordered the change in the US. Reluctantly, many complied; however, some still do not.

Cecil
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  #10  
Old 18th April 2007, 03:08 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy View Post
Ron, once a cardinal always a cardinal? or do they revert back to bishops after their retirement or appointment? Sammy.

Once a deacon, always a deacon.
Once a priest, always a priest.
Once a bishop, always a bishop.
because deacons, priests, and bishops are ordained.
Even if an ordained person ends up in Hell,
they still retain the character on their soul of
a deacon, priest, or bishop.

However, one attains to the office of Cardinal by appointment,
not by a Sacrament. So a Cardinal can be removed from office,
and he then ceases to be a Cardinal.

Upon retirement, a Cardinal loses all of the authority he had as
a Cardinal. However, if he was also a Bishop, which is usually the
case, he still retains, to some extent, the role of an Apostle.
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