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  #1  
Old 26th January 2009, 01:24 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default TS 30: The Council of Trent

"Council of Trent, lasted eighteen years (1545-1563) under five popes: Paul III, Julius III, Marcellus II, Paul IV and Pius IV, and under the Emperors Charles V and Ferdinand. There were present 5 cardinal legates of the Holy See, 3 patriarchs, 33 archbishops, 235 bishops, 7 abbots, 7 generals of monastic orders, 160 doctors of divinity. It was convoked to examine and condemn the errors promulgated by Luther and other Reformers, and to reform the discipline of the Church. Of all councils it lasted longest, issued the largest number of dogmatic and reformatory decrees, and produced the most beneficial results"
http://www.piar.hu/councils/ecum18.htm

It will take more time to go through the decrees of the Council of Trent than with the previous councils. Please try to keep current with these posts.

Trent was a reaction to the errors of Protestantism, and also to some problems within the Catholic Church.

FIRST SESSION

The opening of the Council

SECOND SESSION

Decisions on the conduct of the Bishops during the Council of Trent

THIRD SESSION

The Creed

I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth,
of all things visible and invisible;

and in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God,
and born of the Father before all ages;
God of God, light of light, true God of true God;
begotten, not made,
consubstantial with the Father,
by whom all things were made:
who for us men, and for our salvation,
came down from the heavens,
and was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary,
and was made man: crucified also for us under Pontius Pilate,
he suffered and was buried;
and he rose again on the third day, according to the Scriptures;
and he ascended into heaven, sitteth at the right hand of the Father ;
and again he will come with glory to judge the living and the dead;
of whose kingdom there shall be no end:

and in the Holy Ghost the Lord, and the giver of life,
who proceedeth from the Father and the Son;
who with the Father and the Son together is adored and glorified;
who spoke by the prophets and one holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.
I confess one baptism for the remission of sins; and
I look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come.
Amen.
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  #2  
Old 26th January 2009, 08:35 PM
Rob Rob is offline
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Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
...160 doctors of divinity.....

Ron, who are these people? Bishops who had a particular knowledge in theology or ordained such as priests or monks but not necessarily bishops.
If so, would they have been able to take part in a Council not necessarily in an active role since only bishops can exercise the gift of Magisterium?
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Old 26th January 2009, 10:32 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob View Post
Ron, who are these people? Bishops who had a particular knowledge in theology or ordained such as priests or monks but not necessarily bishops.
If so, would they have been able to take part in a Council not necessarily in an active role since only bishops can exercise the gift of Magisterium?

These doctors of divinity were theologians, most of whom in that time period would have been priests or religious. They advised the Pope and Bishops. This was true also at Vatican II. There were a number of theologians who functioned as theological advisors, and who undoubtedly helped to write the documents of the Council.

Yes, only Bishops can exercise the Magisterium. However, some Ecumenical Councils have permitted the participation of abbots, heads of religious order, and very often theologians. But it would not be a Council without the Bishops and the Pope. Other participants are non-essential.
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Old 26th January 2009, 11:27 PM
Joey Joey is offline
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Ron,
In the third session of this Council of Trent you have listed the Creed. I thought it was at the Council of Nicaea that the Creed was written, hence the Nicene Creed.
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Old 27th January 2009, 02:42 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Ron,
In the third session of this Council of Trent you have listed the Creed. I thought it was at the Council of Nicaea that the Creed was written, hence the Nicene Creed.

I number of different Councils have written a Creed, or modified an existing Creed. The Nicene Creed was modified at the First Council of Constantinople. Creeds are summaries of essential beliefs. They change over time in order to address heresies, and to reflect an increasing understanding of the truths of Divine Revelation.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11049a.htm
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Old 27th January 2009, 11:27 AM
Joey Joey is offline
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Gotcha.....thanks!
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  #7  
Old 27th January 2009, 03:05 PM
Archangel Michael Archangel Michael is offline
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Ron,

Does all the Anathemas sits still apply today?

I affirm everything that each council teaches, but I just remember when I was younger that the Council of Trent seemed it was kinda harsh to the protestants and those that fell away from the faith.
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  #8  
Old 27th January 2009, 03:26 PM
Lazarus Lazarus is offline
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When I read the book of the Council of Trent, EVERY SINGLE CONDEMNATION of the errors or Martin Luther and his cohorts SOUNDS MUSIC TO MY EAR... all these ANATHEMA, ANATHEMA, ANATHEMA, I felt, finally, are a strong defense of my Catholic Church in standing up to the truth.

During my college years, I was befriended and invited by a campus-bible-study-group to a weekend of "retreat" but turned out to be a proselytizing camp for the youth to embrace the Protestant religion and abandon their Cathoilc faith. Since then I went to a long period of confusion in "searching for the truth" until I finally found a strong Catholic group, Opus Dei, that brought me back to the Catholic church.

These "born agains" are notorious for their "bible-attack" and are quite successful in slicing out a big chunk of population away from the Catholic church to become protestants. If only former Catholics were aware Council of Trent, they will not be swayed away into protestantism.
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Old 27th January 2009, 07:14 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archangel Michael View Post
Ron,

Does all the Anathemas sits still apply today?

I affirm everything that each council teaches, but I just remember when I was younger that the Council of Trent seemed it was kinda harsh to the protestants and those that fell away from the faith.

Anathemas attached to temporal decisions of a Council are only still in effect if the temporal authority of the Holy See continues to keep the temporal decision and the anathema in effect.

Anathemas attached to solemn definitions of doctrine by an Ecumenical Council are irreformable and irrevokable. The sins of apostasy, heresy, and schism carry with them, inherently, the sentence of excommunication (which is what is meant by 'anathema').
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  #10  
Old 27th January 2009, 08:21 PM
Lazarus Lazarus is offline
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Hi Ron,

If a person, persistent in his errors, dies under the state of anathema and/or excommunication, does it mean his soul cannot enter heaven?
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