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  #1  
Old 6th May 2011, 06:35 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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Default Pope's new teaching series on prayer

I think the next teaching series will be of great benefit and importance for the faithful in general, but I hope there are no "teachers" who will twist the Pope's intended meaning as it happened with Bl. JP2's TOB.

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/ne...ies-on-prayer/

Last edited by Brother : 6th May 2011 at 06:37 PM.
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Old 6th May 2011, 06:43 PM
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Ron,

Do you think this post could be moved to the teaching series and then, if necessary, you could give a comment as we go along with this teachings every week?...
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Old 6th May 2011, 06:54 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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I don't need to move the thread. It can remain in the current category:
Catholic Continuing Education - Prayer

Yes, I'd be happy to follow along and comment, but only as long as the members participate in the threads on this topic.

Here is the link to the page that has/will have all of the audiences on this topic this year:
http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/be...1/index_en.htm

"The pagan religions, however, remain a plea for divine help, an expression of that profound human yearning for God which finds its highest expression and fulfilment in the Old and New Testaments. Divine revelation, in fact, purifies and fulfils manís innate desire for God and offers us, through prayer, the possibility of a deeper relationship with our heavenly Father."

Even the ancient pagan religious, which were not based on true Divine Revelation, had some good elements in them. Just as we are learning in the thread on Vatican I, by reason alone man can know that God exists, that He is our creator, that He is good, and that we should worship Him.

By our very nature as human persons, with free will and intellect, we have the ability to know that God exists and to seek Him. We have the gift of human nature, which is inherently ordered toward God, prayer, and living a moral life. For our good nature is a reflection of God's Good Divine Nature. So we naturally seek Him as our highest good and final end.
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Old 6th May 2011, 07:08 PM
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Ok, I'll be happy to follow along and participate as well.

Regarding the pagan religions, it comes to mind the Mayan civilization for example that made sacrifices to their god(s) (sun, moon, etc.) in exchange for goods such as rain or food. So, by reason alone man knows that a "God" exist; however, man still needs to learn how to pray to the One True God, not to seek Him selfishly, so our prayers are pleasing to Him.
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Old 6th May 2011, 08:01 PM
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The reason of fallen human persons, living in a sinful society, often fails to attain to knowledge that is, in theory, attainable by reason alone. That is why Divine Revelation, and the threefold source of truth: Tradition, Scripture, Magisterium, is so useful, even in some sense necessary, to find the truths of faith and morals needed for salvation.
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Old 7th May 2011, 07:20 AM
feyfifer feyfifer is offline
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Quote:
....however, remain a plea for divine help, an expression of that profound human yearning for God .....

Isnt it curious that just as pagan religions pined for an understanding of God, more modern men shared that same desire through philosophy, and yet his rational processes run into a brick wall, unless he first concedes that God exists.
I am particularly struck by the attempts of atheist philosophers, to propound that goodness exists in man from a font within his own humaness.
In the very begining itself, Plato recognised the paucity of credence in that by emphasing that Socrates had to consider that all things good had to emmanate from a common source far greater in goodness than the self of Man.
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Old 12th May 2011, 10:06 PM
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"In our catechesis on Christian prayer, we have seen how prayer is part of the universal human experience. Our own age, marked by secularism, rationalism and an apparent eclipse of God, is showing signs of a renewed religious sense and a recognition of the inadequacy of a purely horizontal, material vision of life. Man is made in the image of God; a desire for God is present in every heart and man in some way knows that he is capable of speaking to God in prayer. Saint Thomas Aquinas tells us that prayer is the expression of our desire for God, a desire which is itself Godís gift. Prayer is first and foremost a matter of the heart, where we experience Godís call and our dependence on his help to transcend our limitations and sinfulness. The posture of kneeling at prayer expresses this acknowledgment of our need and our openness to Godís gift of himself in a mysterious encounter of friendship. Let us resolve to pray more frequently, to listen in the silence of our hearts to Godís voice, and to grow in union with the God who has revealed himself in Jesus Christ, with the One who is infinite Love."
http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/be...110511_en.html
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Old 12th May 2011, 10:08 PM
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Human nature is good, but God is infinitely Good. And so human nature naturally seeks that higher good. And since the highest goods in our nature are free will and intellect (reason), we seek that higher good by conversation, by thoughts and desires, by use of free will and intellect. And this search for God by our will and mind results in prayer.
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Old 13th May 2011, 10:04 AM
feyfifer feyfifer is offline
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Ron,
Why does absolute dedication to God in the present moment not sustain our holiness into the future of our lives?
I mean, at one moment an ardent prayer offers up the will and the begs for the desire to be one with God foever..not necessarily ceasing to exist on earth,..but living as God wishes till our moment to enter Heaven. Yet inevitably, we find ourselves developing this "entropy" where divine assistance should have "oiled the mechanism" of our relationship with God!
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Old 13th May 2011, 11:26 AM
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We have free will, so we can change in our dedication.
We have concupiscence, so we are continually pulled away from God,
even as our good human nature also pulls us toward God.
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