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Old 11th November 2008, 12:23 AM
Climacus Areopagite Climacus Areopagite is offline
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Default 1 Maccabees: 1-9

I like to use this passage of Scripture when arguing in favor of total inspiration and inerrancy:

{1:1} And it happened afterwards that Alexander, the son of Philip the Macedonian, who first reigned in Greece having come from the land of Kittim, struck Darius the king of the Persians and the Medes.
{1:2} He appointed many battles, and he took hold of all the fortifications, and he executed the kings of the earth.
{1:3} And he passed through even to the ends of the earth. And he received the spoils of many nations. And the earth was silenced in his sight.
{1:4} And he gathered together power, and an exceedingly strong army. And he was exalted, and his heart was lifted up.
{1:5} And he captured the regions of nations and of sovereign leaders, and they became tributaries to him.
{1:6} And after these things, he fell down on his bed, and he knew that he would die.
{1:7} And he called his servants, nobles who were raised with him from his youth. And he divided his kingdom to them, while he was still alive.
{1:8} And Alexander reigned twelve years, and then he died.
{1:9} And his servants obtained his kingdom, each one in his place.

~ A couple of points here. Notice Scripture is asserting where he was from, who he was the son of, who he conquered, how long he reigned (12 years). These facts are not a matter of faith and morals yet they are still inerrant since the Holy Spirit inspired the human author to write down these exact things.

Now, let us say hypothetically, a Catholic scholar was doing research into history or archaeology and based on it his discoveres he comes to the conclusion that Alexander reigned for 14 years and not twelve, or that he was the son of Aristotle, not Philip etc. Then he begins to teach and publish that the Bible is in error.

His scientific conclusions contradict that which is being asserted in Sacred Scripture by the human author who was directly inspired by the Holy Spirit to record those exact facts. Therefore his research is null and void, and his view that the Bible is in error is heresy.

Also notice, that mixed in these passages are a few figures of speech such as, "And he passed through even to the ends of the earth" and "and his heart was lifted up" and "the earth was silenced in his sight." These figures of speech are also asserting truths free from error yet they are a bit more difficult to interpret than the plain facts being asserted within the same passages about Alexander.



on a side note I have a question for you Ron. I have trouble with the phrase:

"and his heart was lifted up."

to me it could mean that he was proud and pompous as a god, or it could mean that he was generous and possessed largesse.

Do you have a better idea on what this figure of speech could mean?

Last edited by Climacus Areopagite : 11th November 2008 at 12:46 AM.
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Old 11th November 2008, 12:34 PM
Rob Rob is offline
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From the little research I made I can tell that the battle of Gaugamela between Alexander and Darius happened around october 331 B.C. because there was a lunar eclipse the day before the battle, clearly visible in the area. A babylonian tablet records position of the sun and other planets visible. Historians generally agree on the twelve years of Alexander's reign.
The problems come after the death of Alexander, there is no agreement on when the Seleucid calendar did start and in which month, there might have been variations between the court and local calendars.
Maccabees describes a sabbatical year, that should be useful in determining the Seleucid years against Julian calendar better.
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Old 11th November 2008, 01:22 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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et exaltatum est, et elevatum cor eius:

his heart was lifted up could mean a number of different things. On the literal level of meaning it means that he was arrogant and self-exalting.

But it could be taken on a spiritual level of meaning to refer to the great monarch, in which case the lifting up of his heart would be in prayer and he would be exalted by God, not self-exalting.
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Old 11th November 2008, 09:05 PM
Climacus Areopagite Climacus Areopagite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
et exaltatum est, et elevatum cor eius:

his heart was lifted up could mean a number of different things. On the literal level of meaning it means that he was arrogant and self-exalting.

But it could be taken on a spiritual level of meaning to refer to the great monarch, in which case the lifting up of his heart would be in prayer and he would be exalted by God, not self-exalting.

thanks Ron.

I definitely agree, on the spiritual level some of these verses about Alexander refer to the GM.
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