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  #11  
Old 26th May 2010, 07:09 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Brother,

No, I don't agree with any of what you are saying in your post above.

Merely thinking about murdering someone, without an actual willingness to commit the act, is not the sin of murder, and is not necessarily a mortal sin. A mere fantasy about a sinful act (a mortal sin), without willingness to commit the act, is not itself inherently a mortal sin. It could become mortal, like any act, with a gravely immoral intention, or grave harm in the consequences (if the bad consequences outweigh the good to a grave extent). But it is not always gravely immoral.

Similarly, merely thinking about sexual relations, even outside of marriage or with a married woman, is not necessarily a mortal sin unless there is an actual willingness to commit the act. This interior consent to an illicit sexual act is lust. This is why Jesus describes lust by connecting it to an illicit sexual act: adultery of the heart.

Lust can occur during a licit sexual act, such as a husband who has natural marital relations with his wife, but who treats her as a sexual object, so that his interior act is as if to an illicit sexual act (he does not have relations with her as with a spouse, but as with a sexual object).

Lust can occur during an illicit sexual act, such as during sexual relations outside of marriage. But an illicit sexual act does not necessarily include lust. For example, if a non-Catholic man and woman are dating, and do not know that premarital sex is immoral, they might commit that objective mortal sin without the sin of lust, if they are having sexual relations as an expression of love, not of lust.

The consequences of an act are the good and bad results, so for example, adultery is not only intrinsically evil due to two evil moral objects (breaking of vows, absence of marital meaning), it also causes grave harm to the spouse and the family.
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  #12  
Old 26th May 2010, 07:33 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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Thanks Ron,

I think I'm starting to understand much better now.

It's important to differentiate more clearly between the mere thinking and the actual willingness.
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  #13  
Old 26th May 2010, 07:44 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brother View Post
It's important to differentiate more clearly between the mere thinking and the actual willingness.

Yes, that is the distinction that St. Thomas offers, and which I am explaining in my own way. Of course, we should avoid even venial sins in heart and mind. But not every thought about a sinful act is a mortal sin.
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  #14  
Old 26th May 2010, 07:47 PM
sammy sammy is offline
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I think this is an important topic because we all struggle with this. I have not reached this topic in Ron's book yet and have learned by following along. This has been very informative for me.
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