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  #1  
Old 11th April 2007, 08:31 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Default TS 2: Deuterocanonical Books

There are 7 OT books and parts of two other books, which are in Catholic bibles but not in Protestant bibles. These books are called Deuterocanonical by Catholics, and Apocryphal by Protestants. There are also other books which are called Apocryphal by both Catholics and Protestants (and accepted by neither as inspired).
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Old 11th April 2007, 10:14 PM
sammy sammy is offline
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Are the parts of the 2 other books NT or OT?
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Old 11th April 2007, 10:27 PM
js1975 js1975 is offline
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Are there any writing that are not in the Catholic Bible, yet are still considered inspired or infallible?
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Old 11th April 2007, 11:04 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy View Post
Are the parts of the 2 other books NT or OT?

The seven books are:

1. Tobit
2. Judith
3. Baruch (including Jeremiah's letter as chapter 6)
4. Wisdom
5. Sirach
6. 1 Maccabees
7. 2 Maccabees

Plus parts of Daniel and Esther

All the Deuterocanonical books are in the OT.
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Old 11th April 2007, 11:06 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Originally Posted by js1975 View Post
Are there any writing that are not in the Catholic Bible, yet are still considered inspired or infallible?

No, all non-canonical books and other writings are not considered inspired by the Holy Spirit.

Infallible teachings of the Church are not considered to be inspired,
as are the infallible and inspired books of the Bible.

The inspiration of the Bible is unique.
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Old 12th April 2007, 11:34 AM
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The Protestants have such a hard time with the Catholic Bible and the additional books. But when you ask them where the Bible came from or who compiled it they are stumped and then agitated when you give the answer that it was Catholics.
Lee
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Old 14th April 2007, 06:39 PM
Rob Rob is offline
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Ron,

As far as I know even Jews miss some books or parts of books that the catholic church has. For example Jews miss the story of Susannah at the end of Daniel which they regard apocryphal.
My question would be then, where did christians took their bible? How did the church manage to distinguish between apocryphal and true books? Who did "standardise" the books and when? How is possible to distinguish between apocryphal and non-apocryphal books? Thanks

Roberto
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Old 14th April 2007, 08:25 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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The Jews used Hebrew and the language of their faith.
And the center of worship was Jerusalem.

But over time, some persons were added to the Jewish faith who were not of Hebrew descent; many of these lived far from Jerusalem. They and their descendants began to prefer Greek (a language common among scholars) as their written language. A group of about 70 Greek speaking/writing Jewish scholars developed the Septuagint. This included some book written later than the other books, and written in Greek, not Hebrew.

The Hebraic Jews had some animosity towards the Greek Jews. They rejected these books written in Greek. They accepted only the earlier books written almost entirely in Hebrew.

This animosity carried over into the Christian faith. Some early Christians were formerly Hebraic Jews and some were formerly Greek-speaking Jews. A conflict between them is described in Acts, which led to the first Deacons being appointed.

The earliest Christians were rejected by the Jewish leaders of Jerusalem. Christianity spread far and wide. Very soon, the preferred version of Scripture was the Greek Septuagint. Only later did Latin become the vulgate (referring to the common version).

Protestants reject the additional books and portions of books in the Septuagint, but not in the Hebraic Jewish canon. Catholics accept the OT Scriptures in Greek as well as Hebrew (with some portions of some books in Aramaic).
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Old 14th April 2007, 09:51 PM
Joey Joey is offline
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From time to time (and now is one of them), I try to envision what is was like for the apostles, disciples and early Christians. Evangelizing the world to a new creed, and putting aside old beliefs and traditions is hardly a piece of cake. Add to that, all of the cultures, languages, and traditions of other nations, and it is bound to become messy here and there. A Christian Greek Jew would have a lot to sift through before he reached a full conversion. So it will probably be in the years to come. Those who take heed to the Warning would do well to study the words from 'Acts'. After the re-unification of the Protestants, the animosity over particular books in the Bible will hopefully diminish.
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Old 15th April 2007, 05:19 AM
Therese Therese is offline
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Post The Deuterocanonical Books

Thanks Ron for your explanation about this subject. I knew the apocrypha were not infallible but I didn't know about the differences between Greek speaking and Hebrew speaking Jews Regards Therese
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