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  #11  
Old 28th January 2010, 03:06 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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Just to clarify, when choosing to sleep on the floor, I think one should still use a pillow (or something alike) to avoid injuries to the head. (perhaps needles to say, but just in case).

The purpose of self-mortifications is to cause some discomfort to offer it to God in reparation the sins of the world, not to damage our health and is only a means, not an end.

Last edited by Brother : 28th January 2010 at 03:16 PM.
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  #12  
Old 8th February 2010, 12:23 AM
Filotea Filotea is offline
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In my opinion, these people who practice mortification have a special calling from God. This is called ascetism. All the saints practice mortification, some at a higher degree than others (All of us are called to certain degree of martification). They are all inspired by the Holy Ghost to do these kinds of sacrifices for sinners and to resemble the crusified Jesus. For example, Antonietta Meo, she was a 6 year old child with bone cancer. Her leg was amputated and as a sacrifice to Jesus, she slept on the side of her injury to have more pain to offer to Jesus. Additionally, Saint Faustina Kowalska talked about how valuable suffering is for our souls. Also, remember Saint Rose of Lima, she would wear a crown of thorns and rub spices on her skin as a penance for sinners. She's really known for her ascetic life. In my humble opinion, these people are special souls called by God as victims for sinners.
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  #13  
Old 8th February 2010, 12:34 AM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Yes, I agree. The ordinary sacrifices that most Christians are called to make are those sufferings given to us in our lives by Providence, prayer, fasting and other ordinary acts of self-denial, and works of mercy. Some of the Saints chose particular severe acts of self-denial, such as living as a hermit in a cave, which ordinary Christians should not do, because these sacrifices would conflict with the duties of their state of life.

One must also be careful not to harm self or others in various types of sacrifices, since suffering is only a means to an end (the end of being more detached from the lesser goods of this life in order to be free to love God and neighbor with greater purity). When acts of self-denial become an end in themselves, then these acts are sinful.
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  #14  
Old 8th February 2010, 12:58 AM
Pontifex Pontifex is offline
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I also agree that mortification should be practiced by all according to one's state in life. It is, in a certain way, the prayer of one's body, like an offering to God for some purpose.
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  #15  
Old 8th February 2010, 04:01 AM
Lazarus Lazarus is offline
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Default ooouuuchh!

One of the pains JPII suffered, as related by a priest who knew him well, was during a motorcade as the guards were trying to whisk him away from paparazzi, he was hurriedly put in his car and one of the guards slammed the car door very hard indeed - and the Pope's finger caught in-between the door. Imagine the enormous pains he bore - silentlly, without complaints, and privately as very few knew about this incident which was kept private.
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  #16  
Old 8th February 2010, 12:29 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Accepting the crosses that the Providence of God gives you is an important part of self-denial.
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  #17  
Old 18th February 2010, 06:25 PM
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Sacredcello Sacredcello is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
Accepting the crosses that the Providence of God gives you is an important part of self-denial.

Is there a difference between accepting crosses we have not chosen for ourselves and those mortifications that are chosen, such as JPII? He certainly had many crosses that he had no choice in, such as his assassination attempt and Parkinson's disease, etc. Yet, he chose to do more.

I am starting to get concerned about the Warning and whether I have done enough penance. Would it be prudent to take on more penance in addition to the crosses that are given by the Providence of God?

I watched "The Passion of Bernadette" yesterday and one of the sisters in Bernadette's convent would whip herself. Yet, she smiled about it when Bernadette knocked on her door.
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  #18  
Old 18th February 2010, 08:12 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacredcello View Post
Is there a difference between accepting crosses we have not chosen for ourselves and those mortifications that are chosen, such as JPII? He certainly had many crosses that he had no choice in, such as his assassination attempt and Parkinson's disease, etc. Yet, he chose to do more.

I am starting to get concerned about the Warning and whether I have done enough penance. Would it be prudent to take on more penance in addition to the crosses that are given by the Providence of God?

Penance includes sufferings given by the Providence of God, prayer, acts of self-denial that we choose for ourselves, and works of mercy. Every Catholic should have done all these types of penance, and should continue to do so. Prudential judgment is needed in order to decide which types of penance to do when.

I don't know if you need more penance in your life.
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  #19  
Old 13th April 2011, 12:48 PM
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Default JPII Beatification

Saw this earlier today. Good to know!

http://www.catholicnews.com/data/sto...ns/1101438.htm
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  #20  
Old 13th April 2011, 02:12 PM
garabandalg garabandalg is offline
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Default Suffering is a blessing many run from...

I believe that suffering holds a tremendous spiritual value on many levels. Not only does it give us a small taste of what Christ went through ( very very small, but at least offered as such), but it also "takes us down a notch" and inspires humility, contentment, patience, gratitude, compassion etc.

Many people spend their lives seeking comfort and running away from discomfort. It is truly ironic, however, that the chances for eternal "comfort" are heightened by a life moved by seeking out discomfort to oneself in the service of comfort to others. I find that one must strive to be "comfortable with discomfort" and "uncomfortable with comfort" if one truly wants to find salvation and help others do so as well. Easier said than done, but at least a worthy goal.
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