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  #1  
Old 22nd July 2012, 05:10 PM
daytonafreak daytonafreak is offline
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Default Partial and Full Indulgences

Ron, can we review partial indulgences? How does one obtain a partial indulgence? How many can be obtained in a day, a week, or a month? What are some examples of partial indulgences and what are the instructions or normal procedures one must follow in order to obtain a partial indulgence?
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Old 22nd July 2012, 05:53 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Originally Posted by daytonafreak View Post
Ron, can we review partial indulgences? How does one obtain a partial indulgence? How many can be obtained in a day, a week, or a month? What are some examples of partial indulgences and what are the instructions or normal procedures one must follow in order to obtain a partial indulgence?

Indulgences obtain remission from the temporal punishment due for sins that have been forgiven. The culpability (guilt) has been forgiven, but punishment may still be due.

When you make a good confession and are absolved from your sins, sometimes all the temporal punishment that is due for those sins is remitted (satisfied) by the act of making a contrite and devout confession. Every Sacrament remits some temporal punishment due for past sins. So sometimes there is no punishment still due, which would need to be remitted by penance or indulgences.

This temporal punishment can be remitted without any indulgence, simply by any virtuous work, done in cooperation with grace, such as prayer, self-denial, or works of mercy.

An indulgence combines a work of prayer or self-denial or a work of mercy with the treasury of merits of the Church, to obtain a greater remission of temporal punishment than the work alone would provide. In this way, as one body, we all benefit one another within the Church. If you do more penances than your sins require, then you contribute to this treasury of merits, so that others may draw upon it by indulgences.

(Don't be a taker of merits from indulgences only. Strive to be a giver of those merits that others draw by means of indulgences.)

To obtain a partial indulgence, one needs to be in a state of grace, be repentant from the sins whose temporal punishment is being remitted, and do the work assigned by the Church for the indulgence.

There are numerous different indulgences granted by the Church. New ones are added from time to time. I'm not sure where to find an up-to-date list of all indulgences.

"Dispositions necessary to gain an indulgence

"The mere fact that the Church proclaims an indulgence does not imply that it can be gained without effort on the part of the faithful. From what has been said above, it is clear that the recipient must be free from the guilt of mortal sin. Furthermore, for plenary indulgences, confession and Communion are usually required, while for partial indulgences, though confession is not obligatory, the formula corde saltem contrito, i.e. "at least with a contrite heart", is the customary prescription.... It is also necessary to have the intention, at least habitual, of gaining the indulgence. Finally, from the nature of the case, it is obvious that one must perform the good works — prayers, alms deeds, visits to a church, etc. — which are prescribed in the granting of an indulgence." Source

Plenary indulgences require that the penitent be free from attachment to any sin. But if a penitent attempts to gain a plenary indulgence and fails on this point, he still obtains a partial indulgence.
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  #3  
Old 22nd July 2012, 09:34 PM
daytonafreak daytonafreak is offline
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Thanks Ron, there was some info in there that I was not aware of. Much appreciated.
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Old 29th July 2012, 10:12 PM
VKallin VKallin is offline
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Default The Portiuncula Indulgence

This week, August 1st & 2nd, a plenary indulgence is available. This indulgence was obtained by St. Francis of Assisi and approved by Pope Honorious III in the 13th century. It was reaffirmed in 1967 by Pope Paul VIth in his "Indulgentiarum Doctrina".

The requirements for the indulgence are as follows:

1. A visit to any Catholic Church, Chapel, or Oratory
2. Recitation of the Apostles Creed, Our Father, Hail Mary, and Glory Be - for the intentions of the Holy Father
3. Reception of Holy Communion
4. Sacrament of Reconciliation within 8 days.
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Old 29th July 2012, 10:20 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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A plenary (full) indulgence is granted on August 2nd of each year:
The Portiuncula (little portion) indulgence.

This Thursday, August 2nd:

To obtain the Portiuncula plenary indulgence,

(1) a person must visit a Franciscan sanctuary or one’s parish church on August 2nd with the intention of honoring Our Lady of the Angels, and pray the Our Father, the Apostles' Creed, and another prayer for the intentions of the Pope;

(2) attend Mass and receive holy Communion, preferably on August 2nd, but at least within 8 days before or after (a longer time is permissible if confession is not available);

(3) receive the Sacrament of Confession within 8 days before or after (a longer time is permissible if confession is not available);

(4) and -- for the indulgence to be full -- you should be free, at least intentionally, of attachment to venial and mortal sin, and truly repentant.

If you fail to obtain an plenary indulgence due to attachment to some sin, but you perform the other works, the indulgence is partial.

Some commentators say within 20 days before or after, but the norms say "several days". Since confession and Mass are widely available on weekends, 8 days before and after usually suffices. When confession or Mass is not available, a longer time will certainly still fulfill the conditions.
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Old 31st July 2012, 01:47 PM
Brother Brother is offline
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Wow Thanks for the information.

So, after receiving plenary indulgence, a person is clean of all his/her past sins and due punishments, right?...

That's very good!
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Old 31st July 2012, 03:03 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Wow Thanks for the information.

So, after receiving plenary indulgence, a person is clean of all his/her past sins and due punishments, right?...

That's very good!

The valid reception of Confession forgives all sin, and the plenary indulgence forgives all temporal punishment due.
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Old 31st July 2012, 06:55 PM
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Sacredcello Sacredcello is offline
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Thank you for this reminder. St. Francis is a blessing to us in every age.
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  #9  
Old 31st July 2012, 07:34 PM
jbbt9 jbbt9 is offline
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Default Plenary vs Divine Mercy Sunday

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Conte View Post
The valid reception of Confession forgives all sin, and the plenary indulgence forgives all temporal punishment due.

Ron

Do the promises attached to Divine Mercy Sunday (first Sunday after Easter) exceed or equal the benefits from a plenary indulgence or how do they differ?
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Old 31st July 2012, 08:43 PM
Ron Conte Ron Conte is offline
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Ron
Do the promises attached to Divine Mercy Sunday (first Sunday after Easter) exceed or equal the benefits from a plenary indulgence or how do they differ?

Opinions vary on this question. My position is that the benefits of Divine Mercy Sunday are those of Confession -- forgiveness of all sins -- and a plenary indulgence -- forgiveness of all temporal punishment due -- but without any additional requirements, such as lacking attachment to even venial sin, or saying certain prayers. So it is simply an easier to obtain plenary indulgence.
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